2017 honda cbr1000rr


2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP Finally Revealed

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP Finally Revealed

The dated CBR1000RR gets a complete redesign for 2017 to finally give Honda a fighting chance in the fiercely competitive high tech Superbike category.

Today, Honda released a brand new generation of the CBR1000RR SP superbike along with a full spec sheet. Much more has gone into this redesign than simply aesthetic modification. In fact, to be precise, 68 percent of the parts that make up the bike’s bill of materials are completely new as opposed to parts carried over from the model year prior. To cut to the chase, below are the top five aspects of the 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP that we think you should take away, if nothing else:

  • Complete electronics package including electronically-controlled Ohlins suspension
  • High-resolution TFT full-color instrument display panel
  • 10 more horsepower over the previous SP model
  • 33 fewer pounds (15 kg) increasing power-to-weight ratio by 14 percent
  • Under $20,000 MSRP

*Note that all specs listed in this article are for the Euro-spec vehicle as the US specs are not yet available.

Aside from the aesthetic changes to the bodywork, the fairings are minimized to reduce material in certain areas such as around the engine case covers exposing more of the motor surfaces.

Honda’s flagship sportbike was definitely due for a full update with the firepower launched by the competition around the market lately such as the all-new Yamaha YZF-R1 and Kawasaki ZX-10R.

Honda blew the competition away in 1992 when the CBR900RR was released with huge power numbers, a chassis that elicited “total control” and in a package that weighed in some 76 lbs lighter than the closest competitor. When the ridiculously-priced $184,000 RC213V-S did not perform nor sell as well as Honda had hoped, a disruptive CBR1000RR redesign was Honda’s best shot at regaining the throne in the Superbike segment on the 25th anniversary of the CBR brand.

CHASSIS

The frame itself on the 2017 CBR1000RR SP shed 600 grams compared to the previous generation by thinning sidewalls and further optimizing material mass allocation. The same was done to the subframe and swingarm along with increasing the rear axle diameter to drop 300g from both parts. The aluminum wheels switched from a 6 spoke Y-shape design to a 5 spoke Y shedding 100g and also improving aerodynamic performance.

Aside from the aesthetic changes to the bodywork, the fairings are minimized to reduce material in certain areas such as around the engine case covers exposing more of the motor surfaces. The upper and mid fairings are pulled inward reducing the overall width of the bike by 18-24mm. This not only reduces weight, but also improves aerodynamics.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP Chassis

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POWERTRAIN

A significant amount of mass is saved with the redesigned motor in the 2017 CBR1000RR SP all while increasing power output by 10 HP. Retaining the same bore and stroke measurements, the compression ratio is up to 13.0:0 from 12.3:1. The engine speed redline has also increased to 13,000 RPM from 12,250. Channeling the exhaust gases is a titanium exhaust system and muffler that saves 6.2 lbs.

Another large portion of the mass savings in the powertrain is 4.4 lbs attributed to the new slip-assist clutch system which also results in 17% less pull force required on the lever. Even the battery was optimized by going with a Lithium Ion design saving 2.2 lbs (half the mass of a typical lead-acid unit). Finally, the titanium fuel tank (first of any mass-produced road bike) saves another 2.9 lbs but is protected by bodywork to reduce the chances of damage to, but also hides this work of art.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP

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TECHNOLOGY

The electronics package on the new CBR1000RR SP is on par with all best-in-class options on the market. The rider-aid package includes ABS, 40g 6-axis IMU, 9-level traction control, slide control, wheelie control, rear wheel lift control, 3-level engine braking, 3-level quick shifter (up AND down including auto throttle blipping), fly-by-wire throttle with resistance feedback simulator built into the twist grip mechanism, and electronically-adjustable Ohlins suspension. The instrument panel uses a TFT display similar to that on the RCV213-S (and also suspiciously similar to that on the YZF-R1).

Ohlins has provided an extremely impressive package on the CBR1000RR SP for 2017. The 43mm NIX forks and TTX 36 rear shock are electronically controlled by the Ohlins S-EC system. The Bosch MM5.10 IMU (similar to the IMU on the Ducati 959 Panigale) sends real-time vehicle data to the suspension components to instantly optimize compression and damping through small servo motors. This extremely sophisticated system has been available on very few street-legal bikes to date such as the Yamaha YZF-R1M and Ducati Panigale R.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP

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SP2 Racing Homologation Model

Honda has also announced that a CBR1000RR SP2 model will be made available for FIM homologation. The main differences between the SP and SP2 models are the engine head and wheels. The top end of the SP2 motor has 1mm larger intake valves and 1.5mm larger exhaust valves positioned at angles of 10° and 12° respectively. The wheels on the SP2 are forged aluminum Marchesini units for mass, aero and balance advantages. However, without proper race prep and tune, these upgraded wheels will be the only noticeable difference between the SP and SP2 models on the streets. The only reason street-legal versions of the SP2 are being produced is to qualify for the maximum number of racing series and classes, this is a race bike through and through.

HRC race parts and support will also be made available to SP2 owners, but only for those utilizing the bikes on professional race teams. This is an attempt to unlock the advantages of the new motor top end (through ECU flash, camshafts, etc) while keeping these non-EPA-approved modifications off of the street. This is why the US-spec RC213V-S had such disappointing power figures right out of the box when released, especially given the insane price point. The RC213V-S never intended to be an amazing streetbike, but instead a very capable platform from which to build a serious race bike. Regardless, the public perception did not care and the program ultimately suffered. The CBR1000RR SP2 program has a new strategy to avoid this distraction and focus on racing.

At least 500 SP2 units are to be built and sold globally over 2 years at an astonishing price of just $25,000. The CBR1000RR SP2 bike will first be made available for sale to race teams before offering to the general public.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP

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2017 CBR1000RR Availability

American Honda tells us the CBR1000RR SP will be available at dealerships beginning in the March/April 2017 timeframe. We suspect more information on the base-model CBR1000RR will be released at EICMA in Italy in November. However, if we had the guess, the entry-level CBR1000RR will share almost all parts with the SP model expect the Ohlins suspension gear, titanium muffler and perhaps the TFT display at a price point around $16,000. What do you think?

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2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP and SP2 First Look

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP and SP2 |18 Fast Facts

SP 2017 next to the SP 2016

Today at Intermot, Honda announced the new 2017 CBR1000RR SP. On paper, at least, it looks very special indeed.

The project focus was to develop the 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP to be much more precise and powerful. To do that, Honda has lowered the overall weight, reduced inertia by concentrating the mass to the machine’s center of gravity, increased the engine’s power, and incorporated a suite of electronic control systems that includes semi-active Öhlins suspension.

  1. There are actually two 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP models—the SP and SP2. The SP2 is for race homologation purposes and comes with lightweight aluminum wheels. The HRC race kit for the SP2 will be available to qualified race teams.
  2. Just about everything on the flagship CBR has changed. Honda claim 68 percent of it is new.
  3. The photos do not do the CBR1000RR SP justice. This might be the most gorgeous Honda sportbike ever made by the company; the aggressive yet sophisticated lines are accented by a deep, liquid red/white/blue paint scheme that is both elegant and exotic. The beautiful new five-spoke wheels are slightly lighter than the six-spoke ones they replace.
  4. The new SP is sharper, narrower, and looks more aggressive. The differences between the new and current model are obvious when viewing from the front.
  5. The SP is around 35 pounds lighter than the current US-spec SP. Yes, you read that right—35 pounds! That is an almost unheard of weight reduction. It comes from items such as the world’s first production titanium gas tank that saves almost three pounds, strategically thinner sections to the walls of the frame and swingarm, magnesium used for the oil pan and ignition cover (saving 4.5 pounds), a titanium muffler (over six pounds lighter), and there li-ion phosphate battery.
  6. The CBR1000RR SP will be much easier to ride. The current model is supremely light and flickable, but because the yaw moment of inertia has been reduced by 15 percent, and the roll inertia by 10 percent, it will translate to a lighter and more compact motorcycle that will move even more easily to the will of the rider.
  7. The 2017 motor produces 10 more horsepower than last year. The rev limit is raised from 12,250 rpm to 13,000, and power to weight ratio is improved by a whopping 14 percent.
  8. Öhlins electronically controlled suspension is high-end. This is the first Honda that comes with semi-active suspension, and it has three levels of adjustability. Fitted to the SP are Öhlins 43mm NIX 30 EC forks and a TTX 36 EC shock.
  9. The 2017 CBR1000RR SP comes with a full suite of customizable electronics developed directly from the RC213V-S. All electronic functions are individually switchable on the fly. As on the RC213V-S, there are five preset positions with factory recommended configurations—two of presets are open and fully customizable by the rider.
  10. Rider aids are abundant. The 2017 CBR1000RR gets nine levels of Honda Selectable Torque Control (aka traction control), and that includes Rear Wheel Slip Control. Wheel speeds and lean angle are measured using technology developed for Honda’s amazing ASIMO robot, and rear wheelspin and slide are controlled. There are 3-levels of engine braking control, from aggressive to mild.
  11. Wheelie Control mitigates front-wheel lift based on the difference in wheel speeds. Despite using a Bosch IMU for pitch, roll, and yaw data, Honda chose not to use the pitch (back and forth) data for wheelie control. Although that might seem like an oversight to some, for me it is not. Wheelies are a complex phenomenon with some riders wanting lots of front wheel elevation, and others wanting very little or none. Personally, I like very little wheelie control, as I prefer to rely on my throttle control and/or back brake usage to keep the front wheel where I need it. So with this new CBR, it’s relatively easy to defeat the wheelie control by either grabbing a handful in the lower gears, or by cresting over Portimao’s two violent hill crests with too much throttle. For me, it was easy to control the machine with a little back brake, and the Honda reacts so well to rider input I was very satisfied. But make no mistake, this is an expert-level motorcycle and as far as wheelies go, Honda don’t nanny you–kudos for allowing us some freedom I say! In normal circumstances, with smooth throttle input out of slower corners, the wheelie control built into the 9-level traction control floats the front nicely in a low-height wheelie that allows maximum drive from corners. This system is inherited from the RC213V-S exotic that I tested last year, and that bike in turn got those electronics from Honda’s MotoGP machine. So it works well as designed; it aids rider control instead of interfering with it.
  12. The CBR1000RR motor is now throttle-by-wire, and there are five levels of power. Level 1 is full power with each other level reducing both power and level of aggression. The system is, again, developed from the RC213V-S, and there are no cables to be seen; the throttle position sensor is in the twistgrip.
  13. Intelligent ABS has been developed. The CBR1000RR SP’s ABS includes rear-lift control that subtly reduces braking force as rear wheel lift is detected. This allows maximum brake force without the SP becoming overly unbalanced. The ABS also allows for smooth, maximum effect braking on corner entry by controlling brake force according to lean angle. Hard trail braking right to a corner’s apex is claimed to be easier with this system.
  14. The CBR now comes with a quickshifter that includes a blip-downshifter. The feel can be adjusted between three levels on upshifting and downshifting, and benefits include shifting up or down without the throttle or clutch, as well as reducing the load on the transmission during shifting.
  15. The instrument pod is now a lighter full-color TFT liquid crystal display, and from the RC213V-S. Three selectable displays include Street, Circuit, and Mechanic.
  16. All switches, except the start/stop, are now integrated into left handlebar switch module. This includes the lap-timer switch, while the mode and selector switches are moved from the instrument cluster to the left handlebar.
  17. Honda accessories will be available. Street riders will be interested in tank and tail bags, a taller windshield, power take-offs, bar-end weights, and a rear tire hugger.
  18. The 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SPs will not be as expensive as you might expect. Although final dollar amounts have yet to be announced, Honda claims the SP will be “under $20,000” and the SP2 homologation version will be “under $25,000”.

Contrary to the spy photos that have circulated for the past couple of weeks, the 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP is completely and radically different from the current model. It is much lighter, more powerful, and it has all the de rigeur electronic goodies to help riders. The current model is an amazing motorcycle, despite forgoing any updating for several years. We look forward to finding out just how good the 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP will be to ride.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP and SP2 Gallery

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2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade | MCNews.com.au

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

Last month Honda unveiled the more bespoke Fireblade SP2 and SP Fireblade models for 2017, the details of which you can find here, but it was not until overnight in Europe that Big Red unveiled the new standard edition 2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

While not a massive departure from traditional Fireblade styling lines and retaining identical geometry to the outgoing model, 90 per cent of major components are all new for 2017. The 2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade will arrive in Australia in May, 2017, at a RRP of $22,499.

Comparing the outgoing ABS optioned model, with the new ABS as standard equipment Fireblade, the 2017 CBR1000RR is now 15kg lighter and boasts 11 more horespower.

Honda are claiming 189hp (141kW) at 13,000rpm and 114Nm of torque at 11,000rpm, which combine with the significant weight savings to imrpvoe the power-to-weight ratio by 14 per cent.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

The 2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade is also equipped with Honda Selectable Torque Control, Selectable Engine Brake, new ABS, Riding Mode Select System and Power Selector, full Showa suspension and RC213V-S MotoGP derived technology. 

Clearly this is a massive jump forward for the Fireblade in all areas of performance that really matter. Much lower weight, a lot more power and now the full gamut of electronic aids finally making their way onto Honda’s sporting flagship, at the time when such aids have really reached maturity.

And with three models to choose from; the Fireblade, Fireblade SP, and the very limited edition Fireblade SP2 (only 20 of these machines are slated to come to Australia), Honda have a stronger sportsbike armoury than ever before.

The standard Fireblade and the Fireblade SP are expected to arrive in Australia early April but there is, as yet, no word on when when the 20 SP2 models slated for Australia will be available.

2017 Honda Fireblade Summary
  • 8kW power increase
  • Revised valve lift and cam timing
  • Magnesium covers and detail redesign saves 2kg
  • 4-2-1 exhaust with titanium muffler
  • Redesigned slipper clutch
  • 9 level Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC)
  • New ABS
  • Riding Mode Select System (RMSS)
  • 196kg wet weight
  • Showa 43mm Big Piston Forks (BPF) and Balance Free Rear (BFR) shock
  • Adjusted rigidity balance for the frame
  • Stiffer swingarm
  • Lighter subframe
  • New Tokico four-piston radial mount brake calipers
  • Redesigned wheels
  • Minimal and aggressively styled bodywork
  • Throttle By Wire (TBW)
  • Accelerator Position Sensor (APS)
  • Power Selector
  • Wheelie Control
  • Selectable Engine Brake (SEB)
2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade
Mr M. Sato, Large Project Leader (LPL) 17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade

“All 1000cc sportsbikes are extraordinary examples of high performance engineering. But for us, for our new Fireblade we want extraordinary to be the pleasure of handling and controlling such a machine. Its true purpose – wherever it’s ridden – is to enjoy something that is not normally experienced in everyday life, something that cannot be surpassed. The very first CBR900RR remains a milestone in our history, and an inspiration we have drawn on to radically reduce weight and increase power. And, to go to Next Stage Total Control, we have added an electronic control system that is there to support the rider, totally.  What then can our new Fireblade promise our customers? That is simple – the pure joy of riding.”

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade
2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade in Detail

Three factors are key to the essence of the new CBR1000RR Fireblade: less weight, more power, and electronics to help the rider wherever and however they’re riding.

The new electronic control system provides constant, selectable and fine-tunable rider support. Central to the system is the 5-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which measures exactly what the machine is doing, in every plane.

It works with the Honda Selectable Torque Control system (HSTC) that precisely manages rear wheel traction via the FI-ECU and Throttle By Wire (TBW). The new ABS braking (also managed by the IMU) offers Rear Lift Control (RLC) and the ability for hard, safe trail braking into corners. Any difference measured between the front and rear wheel speeds engages Wheelie Control, depending on settings.

Three standard display modes – Street, Circuit and Mechanic – provide all the information required for the rider relevant to the type of riding. The information displayed can be fine-tuned and adjusted while riding by using the left hand switch gear and TFT liquid crystal display, just as on the RC213V-S, Honda’s road going version of its RC213V MotoGP machine.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

While the electronic control is very much a new departure for the Fireblade, the other two factors draw faithfully on the philosophy of the original 1992 machine: the optimal balance of power and weight. Ninety percent of the main components have been changed in a relentless search for incremental weight reduction in every area. The engine revs harder and higher, with a much higher compression ratio and revised cam timing, and uses the TBW (a first for an inline four-cylinder Honda) and Accelerator Position Sensor (APS) also developed for use on the RC213V-S.

Bottom end torque and power are improved, with a significant increase in top-end power – up 8kW to 141kW @ 13,000rpm and 3 modes of engine output character can be selected.

Thanks to the use of magnesium and careful assessment and lightening of individual parts the engine also carries 2kg less. The new titanium exhaust muffler saves weight and aids mass centralisation. Overall the Fireblade is a full 15kg lighter than the outgoing model, with a wet weight of 196kg.

The twin-spar aluminium frame’s rigidity balance has been finely adjusted, and the swingarm is stiffer to match. A new rear subframe is lighter, as are the redesigned wheels, while new Tokico four-piston front brake calipers use high-performance track-ready brake pads.

The Fireblade’s bodywork outlines an aggressive, functional minimalism, and the machine is slimmer and much more compact. All lighting is LED and two paint options – Victory Red and Matt Ballistic Black Metallic – will be available.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

The Fireblade’s new electronic control system provides several active features that many riders will find useful. The new ABS allows extremely hard braking while maintaining rear wheel contact with the ground, stopping the tendency for the rear of the machine to elevate or ‘back in’ around the front. It uses the 2-axis acceleration information from the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and calculates the acceleration of the machine’s centre of gravity in the lift direction and acceleration perpendicular to that, using the front wheel as the grounding point.

The new ABS delivers smooth, effective braking into a corner. With information from the IMU, plus front and rear wheel speed sensors, the ABS modulator controls braking force according to lean angle, even when emergency braking. But it also allows for hard trail braking by using two parameters (deceleration derived from wheel speed and front/rear slip rates) plus lean angle to vary the threshold of ABS intervention. ABS delivers an extra sense of security when braking hard on the road, and offers a performance edge in certain conditions on the racetrack.

In isolation all the functions of the electronic control system – plus the HSTC’s wheelie control – perform specific, individual tasks. When tied together, however and working seamlessly as one they provide technological rider support that truly elevates the super sports experience. Next Stage Total Control, indeed.

Like the RC213V-S the Fireblade uses a full-colour TFT liquid crystal dash to clearly communicate information to the rider. It automatically adjusts to ambient light, with a backlight of up to 1000 cd/m2 luminescence and features 3 modes: Street, Circuit and Mechanic – each with the information most relevant for that particular usage.

Street displays riding modes (1-3 and USER 1-2) plus the settings for each parameter – P (power), T (HSTC) and EB (Selectable Engine Brake). Circuit adds in addition to Street mode the lap time, number of laps and difference from the best lap. Mechanic displays the digital tacho, gear position, grip angle, coolant temperature and battery voltage.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

There are 3 preset riding Modes, Track (1), Winding (2) and Street (3) that offer different combinations of HSTC, Engine Power and Engine Braking level. Riding mode 1 (Track) gives full power, with linear throttle response, low HSTC and EB intervention. Mode 2 (Winding) controls output through first to third gear, with fairly moderate power increase, medium HSTC and strong EB. Mode 3 (Street) controls output through first to fourth gear, with moderate power increase, high HSTC and strong EB.

In the two USER modes all parameters can be combined and adjusted freely; riding modes and HSTC can be changed while riding by using the up/down switch on the left switch gear.

The Shift-Up indicator is a horizontal line of 5 white LEDs located at the top; when engine speeds exceed user presets they go from solid to flashing. Displays include speedometer, tachometer, gear position, coolant temperature, riding distance and twin trip meters.

The onboard computer calculates instantaneous and average fuel economy, trip fuel consumption, average speed and time after last ignition, plus remaining fuel after reserve light and distance to empty (when selected). This information is shown on the bottom right of the screen.

In the upper display, middle right the rider can choose to see the Shift-Up indicator setting speed, grip angle, battery voltage, calendar, or user-defined text.

Switching between modes is controlled by a mode switch on the right of the left hand switchgear. Just above it is an up/down switch that manages and changes the information displayed within the mode.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade
2017 Fireblade Chassis

As a machine now a full 15kg lighter – with a wet weight of 196kg –the Fireblade’s physical handling has also been transformed. Rake and trail remain 23 °20’ / 96mm but the hollow die-cast twin-spar aluminium frame’s rigidity balance has been significantly adjusted to give even sweeter handling with outstanding steering response, feel and stability.

Thinned frame walls save 300g. While transverse rigidity is unchanged, the frame is 10% more flexible in the torsional plane, which works to deliver a faster-reacting chassis. Yaw moment of inertia has been reduced by 15%; roll moment of inertia by10%. The Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD) unobtrusively maintains stability.

To complement the frame changes the aluminium Unit Pro-Link swingarm’s hybrid structure has had the thickness of each section adjusted, saving approx. 300g while maintaining transverse rigidity and increasing torsional rigidity.

The Showa 43mm BPF inverted telescopic fork with its large damping volume effectively reduces hydraulic pressure generated under compression and extension. This results in reduced play during the initial stroke and smoother damping, maximising tyre contact with the tarmac. Spring preload and rebound/compression damping are fully adjustable.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

The rear suspension features a fully adjustable Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion (BFRC). Instead of a conventional single-tube layout, BFRC uses a double-tube design: the damper case and an internal cylinder. The damper piston has no valves – instead the damping force is generated as displaced oil passes through a separate damping component.

This allows pressure changes within the shock to be smoothly controlled. And because there are no small amounts of oil being used at high pressures, damping response and reaction are improved, and damping force can function smoothly during load input. Moreover, damping weight is generated consistently when switching from rebound to compression due to even pressure changes.

The die-cast aluminium subframe too has been redesigned and its thinner construction is at the same time highly rigid and 600g lighter – contributing to the concentration of mass and thus neutral handling feel with improved agility. Wheelbase is 1405mm; seat height is 832mm.

New front Tokico four-piston opposed radial mounted brake calipers are highly rigid, 150g lighter and do without hanger pins. Newly-developed high-mu (coefficient of friction) brake pads are fitted – these have a greater performance parameter at higher temperatures than standard pads. The aluminium wheels are a new five Y-shape design, saving approx. 100g. Tyre sizes are 120/70 R17 front and 190/50 R17 rear.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

Minimal and dynamic are two words used to best describe the Fireblade’s new styling. The design team wanted to create tightly compact proportions and the upper and middle fairing surfaces have been reduced in size as far as possible. Forward tilting character lines inject an aggressive attitude, with a focus on mechanical functionality, detail and quality of finish.

24mm in width has been squeezed from the upper fairing. Airflow control from the flow surfaces of the fairing, to the surface angle of the headlights and the contouring of their side slits supports stability at speed. In a racing crouch the rider is tucked well out of the airstream. In normal riding situations air pressure is evenly distributed on the rider’s shoulders, back and sides.

18mm has been saved across the middle fairing and its ‘knuckles’ double as radiator intake structures that pass discharged air around the outside, and underneath, the rider’s legs. The knee grip area is 15mm per side slimmer, with the interface between tank cover and the seat unit athletically accentuated.

All lighting is crisp LED, with the twin front headlights offering high/low beam on both sides. Crowned with a sharply angled new logo the Fireblade will be available in two paint options: Victory Red and Matt Ballistic Black.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade
2017 Fireblade Electronics

The 17YM Fireblade is the first inline four-cylinder engine from Honda to use Throttle by Wire (TBW) control. Derived and developed from the system used by the RC213V-S, its job is to put precise throttle control – and a very natural feel – in the rider’s right hand.

Heart of the system is a newly developed throttle grip Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) integrated into the right handlebar switchgear, which itself neatly mounts the engine start/stop switch – nothing more. APS converts movement of the grip into an electrical signal sent to the ECU, that then transmits it as an actuator signal to the TBW motor, achieving ideal throttle control relative to grip angle.

The return spring and other mechanisms inside the APS faithfully reproduce the initial play and feel of a cable, with throttle load set specifically for the Fireblade. Throttle bore is increased 2mm to 48mm (without increasing exterior width) and careful shaping of the intake funnels adds to the linear throttle response.

The Power Selector can be accessed through the RMSS. It offers 5 levels of output character: Level 1 give peak output in all six gears; Level 2 output is controlled in each gear to achieve smooth throttle feel under acceleration or deceleration; Level 5 has the strongest output control for most moderate throttle response. All levels have the same throttle response on initial opening.

Riding Mode (1) uses Level 1 as its preset, drawing out the full performance of the engine. Mode (2) uses Level 2, and is suitable for twisty roads and city environments, while Mode (3) goes to Level 5 for maximum security. Individual rider preferences can also be input manually through the USER 1 and 2 interface.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

The Fireblade employs an enhanced version of the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) used on the RC213V-S. It controls engine torque via two sensing methods – the first uses wheel speed sensors to measure and compare front and rear wheel speeds. When the FI-ECU detects rear wheel acceleration (and front wheel deceleration) it reduces the TBW throttle position, and thus output, keeping the front wheel on the ground. Maximum application of the throttle is thus possible without fear of wheelies, with 3 levels of Wheelie Control, plus off.

The second sensing function detects machine roll angle. The IMU located under the seat detects rotational speed in the chassis’ roll and yaw directions, and acceleration in the longitudinal, lateral and vertical directions. It then calculates roll angle to control engine torque, maintaining rear wheel traction at the required level. The body roll calculation logic used by the ECU uses the same attitude detection technologies developed for Honda’s ASIMO humanoid robot, enabling the most precise calculation possible.

Nine intervention levels (plus off) are offered by HSTC to suit rider preferences, and the Riding Modes USER 1 and 2 enable individual changes to be made while moving.

There is also a Selectable Engine Brake (SEB) system to change engine-braking character to match rider preference and a range of conditions. Level 1 offers the highest braking force, Level 3 the lowest. The preset Modes 1, 2 and 3 use recommended settings, but through USER 1 and 2 can be set individually.

A Quickshifter with Downshift Assist system (as fitted to the CBR1000RR Fireblade SP1) is available as an optional extra.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade
2017 Fireblade Engine

Honda’s engineers exhaustively re-examined the Fireblade’s 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine to make it as light and powerful as possible. The result of the work is an extra 8kW, the loss of 2kg and raised rev ceiling of 13,000rpm.

Peak power is 141kW @ 13,000rpm, with peak torque of 114Nm delivered @ 11,000rpm. Bore and stroke remain 76 x 55mm but compression ratio is up from 12.3:1 to 13:1. This is an engine in a very high state of tune and the crankshaft, valve train and transmission all use higher specification materials than the previous design.

The pistons feature an optimised wall thickness and a new crown design to raise the compression; the surface finishing of the piston-ring grooves has also been modified to improve sealing performance and efficiency. Valve lift and cam timing has been revised to match the higher rpm and greater engine performance.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade

Power up is just one part of the Fireblade’s story – reduced weight is another. So every part of the engine was scrutinised to see if it could be made lighter. All the engine covers are redesigned (clutch cover is aluminium; the ignition cover magnesium) and the length of the bolts, water hose and water hose bands have been reduced.

With a revised, rounded shape the radiator is 30mm narrower in overall width and 100g lighter (including a 30cc reduction in water capacity). Using a new high-density core it achieves identical heat dissipation and contributes to the slimmer frontal area of the fairing cowls.

The assist slipper clutch is completely revised with a single die-cast pressure plate and clutch centre, and offers reduced load at the lever. For downshifts the slipper functionality remains the same as before but aluminium cam parts (instead of steel) save weight. The gap between the accelerating and decelerating cams has also been optimised, again improving lever feel when changing gear. All of the transmission gears have been pared down to save weight.

The titanium irregular cross-section muffler is 2.8kg lighter and minimises the centre of gravity change; it also creates an unmistakable sound tone from the exhaust on an open throttle. The exhaust supplier to the Honda Repsol MotoGP team was asked to develop the prototype and produced an exquisite design with the 4-2-1 double-skinned downpipes incorporating the exhaust valve within the first main pipe.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade
2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade Technical Specifications
ENGINE
Type Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 16-valve DOHC Inline-4
Engine Displacement (cm³) 999cc
No. of Valves per Cylinder 4
Bore ´ Stroke (mm) 76 x 55
Compression Ratio 13:01
Max. Power Output 141kW/13,000rpm
Max. Torque 114Nm/11,000rpm
Oil Capacity 3.4L
FUEL SYSTEM
Carburation PGM-DSFI
Fuel Tank Capacity 16L
Fuel Consumption
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Starter Electric
Battery Capacity 12V-7AH(Li-ion)
ACG Output 0.42kw
DRIVETRAIN
Clutch Type Wet, multiplate with diaphragm spring

with assist slipper

Transmission Type 6-speed
Final Drive Chain
FRAME
Type Diamond; aluminium composite twin spar
CHASSIS
Dimensions (L´W´H) 2,065mm x 720mm x 1125mm
Wheelbase 1405mm
Caster Angle 23°20’
Trail 96mm
Seat Height 832mm
Ground Clearance 130mm
Kerb Weight 196kg
Turning radius
SUSPENSION
Type Front Telescopic inverted fork with an inner tube diameter of 43 mm, and a Big Piston Front Fork with preload, compression and rebound adjustment, 120mm stroke
Type Rear Unit Pro-Link with gas-charged HMAS damper featuring 10-step preload and stepless compression and rebound damping adjustment, 138.2mm stroke. Rear Balance Free Rear Cushion with preload, compression and rebound adjustment, 62mm stroke.
WHEELS
Rim Size Front 17 inch
Rim Size Rear 17 inch
Tyres Front 120/70ZR17 58W
Tyres Rear 190/50ZR17 73W
BRAKES
ABS System Type 2 Channel
INSTRUMENTS & ELECTRICS
Instruments TFT-LCD
Security System HISS
Headlight LED
Taillight LED

All specifications are provisional and subject to change without notice.

[youtube id=”aBT9qm4lX3I” width=”560" height=”315"]

www.mcnews.com.au

Intermot: Stunning new 2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

‘All 1000cc sportsbikes are extraordinary examples of high performance engineering. But for us, for our new Fireblade, we want extraordinary to be the pleasure of handling and controlling such a machine. Its true purpose – wherever it’s ridden – is to enjoy something that is not normally experienced in everyday life, something that cannot be surpassed,” says Mr Sato-san, large project leader for the new Fireblade. Well, that sounds good.

2017 is the 25th anniversary of the Fireblade, and while we all hoped Honda would do something special to mark the model’s quarter-century, we couldn’t have dreamed that they’d go this far. Rather than simply replacing the exiting stock bike and SP, it looks like we will be treated to three new models for 2017. The mystery omission here is the base model – but who cares about that when there’s this new SP version, and the even more stunning SP2 (turn over for that) on offer?

While Honda’s engineers have certainly remained true to their first principles of the original 1992 project – optimal power to weight ratio, with the focus on cornering, acceleration and braking – they’ve ditched the Honda rulebook on how to achieve those goals. The result is a stunning specification that hints at the Fireblade being back in with a shot at the superbike crown in 2017. Honda call this ‘Next Stage Total Control’. We call it Fireblade.

CBR1000RR handling revolution

Leading the decimation of the rulebook is the introduction of a wild array of electronic control systems – all knitted together by the new 5-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which measures everything the Blade is doing, in every plane, and delivers electronic assistance to the rider to help them do what they’re trying to do, better.

The SP is also the first Honda motorcycle to be equipped with Öhlins S-EC suspension front and rear, using a NIX30 fork and TTX36 shock.

The Suspension Control Unit (SCU) receives roll rate, yaw rate and lean angle information from a 40g 5-axis (3-axis acceleration and 2-axis angular velocity) Bosch MM5.10 IMU gyro located close to the machine’s centre of gravity. It also gathers wheel speed, engine rpm, brake input and throttle angle from the FI-ECU and, depending on the suspension mode selected by the rider delivers optimal compression and damping force (adjusted via each step motor) during normal riding, plus hard acceleration, braking and cornering.

There are three Active modes and three Manual modes for the rider to choose from. When set in Active the  damping force is controlled and optimised to suit the riding conditions. Within the Active Modes the rider can also make fine personal adjustments.

There’s also Rear Lift Control (RLC) to help keep the rear end under control when braking hard, especially into corners, while there’s also Cornering ABS which controls braking force according to lean angle, even when panic braking. This is a massive departure for Honda, having ditched their own C-ABS system in favour of a third-party solution – saving around 10kg in the process.

New CBR1000RR dash

Like the RC213V-S, the Fireblade SP uses a full-colour TFT liquid crystal dash that automatically adjusts to ambient light and features three display modes; Street, Circuit and Mechanic – so you can choose what you see.

Street mode displays riding modes, plus the settings for Power, HSTC, Selectable Engine Brake and Suspension. The onboard computer calculates instantaneous and average fuel economy, trip fuel consumption, average speed and time after last ignition plus remaining fuel after RES light and more.

Circuit mode adds a lap timer, number of laps and difference from the best lap, while Mechanic mode displays the digital tacho, gear position, grip angle, coolant temperature and battery voltage.

CBR1000RR chassis talk

The SP is 14kg lighter than the old Blade, weighing in at a kerb mass of 197kg. Rake and trail remain 23°/96mm but the hollow die-cast twin-spar aluminium frame’s rigidity balance has been significantly adjusted to improve steering response, feel and stability. The frame walls have been thinned to deliver a 500g weight saving, and while its transverse rigidity is unchanged, the frame is 10% more flexible in the torsional plane, which is claimed to deliver a faster-reacting chassis.

To complement the frame changes the aluminium Unit Pro-Link swingarm’s hybrid structure has had the thickness of each section adjusted, saving 100g. The die-cast aluminium subframe gets the same treatment, and now weighs 800g less. The wheelbase is 1404mm; seat height is 831mm.

New wheels shave off another 100g, and wear 120/70 R17 front and 190/50 R17 rear Bridgestone RS10s.

In terms of girth, 24mm of width has been squeezed from the upper fairing, 18mm has been saved across the middle fairing and the knee grip area is 15mm slimmer on each side.

Fireblade electronics and engine

The SP is the first inline four-cylinder engine from Honda to use Throttle by Wire control and is driven by an Acceleration Position Sensor integrated into the right handlebar switchgear.

There are now three rider modes. Mode 1 gives full power, with linear throttle response, low HSTC and EB intervention and high damping force. Mode 2 controls output through first to third gear, with fairly moderate power increase, medium HSTC, strong EB and medium damping force. Mode 3 controls output through first to fourth gear, with moderate power increase, high HSTC, strong EB and low damping force. In USER mode all parameters can be combined and adjusted independently.

A quickshifter is fitted as standard for clutchless upshifts and there’s also Downshift Assist – and auto-blipper – for clutchless downshifts.

Honda’s engineers have ripped the engine apart and hunted for every possible gain. The result is an additional 11bhp, the loss of 2kg and raised rev ceiling of 13,000rpm.

Peak power is now a claimed 189bhp @ 12,500rpm, with peak torque of 81.79ftlb @ 10,500rpm. Bore and stroke remain 76 x 55.1mm but the compression ratio is up from 12.3:1 to 13:1.

We would say that this is the best equipped Fireblade ever, but then we’d look foolish when you see the SP2 version.

 

www.motorcyclenews.com

Обзор на Honda CBR1000RR FIREBLADE SP 2017

Новый FIREBLADE SP меньше, легче, быстрее, но все еще стабилый и лугкий в управление. Одни из лучших на рынке, с огромным спектром настроек, который подходит как для новичков, так и для экспертов. Полуактивная подвеска Öhlins является ведущей по классу, и Honda наконец-то упростила что бы было понятна для всех. Опытные гонщики могут найти поворотный ABS немного слишком навязчивым, но в остальном это очень впечатляющая новая модель. В течение последних нескольких лет Blade сидит в углу 1000-го класса, но теперь он готов занять центральное место.

 

Качество и тормоза Ride

Оценка: 5 из 5

 

SP поставляется с умной полуактивной тормозной системой Öhlins. Система настолько проста в использовании и может быть отрегулирована в четырех основных настройках: «Общие», «Тормоз», «Угол» и «Ускорение». В пределах каждой из этих категорий, отображаемых в полноцветной тире, вы можете перейти на плюс 5 или минус 5. Например, если вы хотите добавить улучшенную поддержку торможения, если вам требуется более быстрое ускорение, добавьте еще раз. Или, если вы хотите меньше, то просто выберите меньше - и если вы полностью отключите его, вы можете вернуться к стандартным настройкам Honda. Угловой режим помогает велосипеду с быстрым изменением направления; снова вы можете пойти плюс и минус. Вы можете изменить эти настройки на дороге или дорожке без остановки.

 

И для тех, кто все еще хочет настроить обычное сжатие и переключение, Honda создала три стандартных режима; M1 Track, M2 Winding и M3 Street. Вы можете добавлять и уменьшать сжатие и отскок с шагом 5%, и снова появляется настройка по умолчанию, если вы ошибаетесь. Но если вы находитесь в ручном режиме, подвеска более условна, а не полуактивна, но может быть изменена в электронном виде на ходу всадника.

 

Тропы - 23 ° / 96 мм, но баланс жесткости алюминиевого каркаса с двойным шпинделем был значительно скорректирован для улучшения реакции, ощущения и устойчивости рулевого управления. Стены каркаса были разбавлены, чтобы обеспечить сохранение веса в 500 г, жесткость не изменилась, рамка на 10% более гибкая по сравнению со старой моделью.

 

 

 

Двигатель

Оценка: 4 из 5

 

Стандартный Blade и SP имеют одинаковый движок. Чтобы искать каждую последнюю производительность, инженеры Honda должны были работать сверхурочно. Результатом является дополнительный 11bhp по сравнению с уходящей моделью, потеря 2 кг и высота потолка до 13 000 оборотов в минуту, на 750 об / мин выше, чем раньше. Пиковая мощность теперь составляет 189 л.с. при 12,500 оборотах в минуту, максимальный крутящий момент составляет 81,79ftlb при 10500 об / мин. Отверстие и ход остаются на уровне 76 x 55,1 мм, но степень сжатия составляет от 12,3: 1 до 13: 1. Блейд 2017 - первый встроенный четырехцилиндровый двигатель от Honda, который использует управление дроссельной заслонкой и управляется датчиком положения ускорения, встроенным в распределительное устройство правого руля.

 

Качество сборки и надежность

Оценка: 5 из 5

 

Качество сборки и отделка отражают относительно высокую цену. Например, возьмите очень умные часы. Как и RC213V-S, Fireblade использует полноцветную жидкокристаллическую панель TFT, которая автоматически настраивается на окружающий свет и имеет три режима отображения; Street, Circuit and Mechanic - так что вы можете выбрать то, что видите. Уличный режим отображает режимы езды, а также настройки для Power, HSTC, выбираемого тормозного механизма и подвески. Бортовой компьютер вычисляет мгновенную и среднюю экономию топлива, расход топлива на расходе, среднюю скорость и время после последнего зажигания плюс оставшееся топливо после света RES и многое другое. Режим схемы добавляет таймер кругов, количество кругов и разницу от лучшего круга, в то время как режим Механика отображает цифровую тахографию, положение редуктора, угол захвата, температуру охлаждающей жидкости и напряжение батареи.

 

Оборудование

Оценка: 5 из 5

 

Полуавтоматическая подвеска входит в стандартную комплектацию SP. Дополнительно по стандартной модели в стандартной комплектации также используется быстродействующий / автопилот, а радиальные суппорты Brembo заменяют предметы Tokico на велосипеде на складе. Топливный бак по-прежнему 16 литров, но для SP он выполнен из титана (а не из стали), сохраняя еще 1 кг. В настоящее время у старого Blade не было никаких помощников для гонщика, но Honda исправила это с помощью ковша электроники, чтобы помочь гонщику на дороге и гоночной трассе. Как и во многих других моделях на рынке, информация собирается из пяти осей IMU, который точно определяет, что делает велосипед. IMU работает в партнерстве с 9-ступенчатым регулированием крутящего момента Honda (HSTC), который точно управляет тягой заднего колеса через FI-ECU и Throttle By Wire (TBW). Новое торможение ABS Bosch (также управляемое IMU) предлагает управление задним освещением (RLC) и управление колесами. На бумаге это впечатляющий набор всадников, но есть еще: есть три режима езды, пять уровней подачи питания, три уровня управления колесами и три уровня торможения двигателем.

 

Спецификация
Размер двигателя 999cc
Год выпуска 2017
Максимальная скорость  299 км/ч
максимальная мощность 189 л.с
Тип двигателя 16v (76X55 мм), 6 передач.
Тип рамки Алюминий.
Вместимость топливных баков 16 литров
Высота сиденья 832mm
Вес велосипеда 196kg
Передняя подвеска 43 мм Öhlins полуактивный.
Задняя подвеска Олины полуактивны.
Передний тормоз 2x 320 мм радиальные суппорты Brembo.
Задний тормоз Диск 220 мм
Размер передней шины 120 / 70x17.
Размер задней шины 190 / 50x17.

 

 

Возможно Вам будет интересно:

alimoto.ru

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP Finally Revealed

2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP Finally Revealed

The dated CBR1000RR gets a complete redesign for 2017 to finally give Honda a fighting chance in the fiercely competitive high-tech superbike category.

Honda on Tuesday released a brand new generation of the CBR1000RR SP superbike along with a full spec sheet.

Much more has gone into this redesign than simply aesthetic modification. In fact, to be precise, 68 percent of the parts that make up the bike’s bill of materials are completely new, as opposed to parts carried over from the model year prior. To cut to the chase, below are the top five aspects of the 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP that we think you should take away, if nothing else:

  • Complete electronics package including electronically-controlled Ohlins suspension
  • High-resolution TFT full-color instrument display panel
  • 10 more horsepower over the previous SP model
  • 33 fewer pounds (15 kg) increasing power-to-weight ratio by 14 percent
  • Under US $20,000 MSRP

*Note that all specs listed in this article are for the Euro-spec vehicle as the US specs are not yet available.

Aside from the aesthetic changes to the bodywork, the fairings are minimized to reduce material in certain areas such as around the engine case covers, exposing more of the motor surfaces.

Honda’s flagship sportbike was definitely due for a full update, considering the firepower launched by the competition around the market lately, such as the all-new Yamaha YZF-R1 and Kawasaki ZX-10R.

Honda blew the competition away in 1992 when the CBR900RR was released with huge power numbers, a chassis that elicited “total control” and in a package that weighed in some 76 lbs lighter than the closest competitor. When the ridiculously-priced $184,000 RC213V-S did not perform nor sell as well as Honda had hoped, a disruptive CBR1000RR redesign was Honda’s best shot at regaining the throne in the superbike segment on the 25th anniversary of the CBR brand.

Chassis

The frame itself on the 2017 CBR1000RR SP shed 600 grams by thinning sidewalls and further optimizing material mass allocation. The same was done to the subframe and swingarm, along with increasing the rear axle diameter to drop 300g from both parts. The aluminum wheels switched from a 6 spoke Y-shape design to a 5-spoke Y shedding 100g and also improving aerodynamic performance.

Aside from the aesthetic changes to the bodywork, the fairings are minimized to reduce material in certain areas, such as around the engine case covers, exposing more of the motor surfaces. The upper and mid fairings are pulled inward, reducing the overall width of the bike by 18-24 mm. This not only reduces weight, but also improves aerodynamics.

Powertrain

A significant amount of mass is saved with the redesigned motor in the 2017 CBR1000RR SP, all while increasing power output by 10 hp. Retaining the same bore and stroke measurements, the compression ratio is up to 13.0:0 from 12.3:1. The engine speed redline has also increased to 13,000 rpm from 12,250. Channeling the exhaust gases is a titanium exhaust system and muffler that saves 6.2 lbs.

Another large portion of the mass savings in the powertrain is 4.4 lbs attributed to the new slip-assist clutch system, which also results in 17 percent less pull force required on the lever. Even the battery was optimized by going with a lithium ion design, saving 2.2 lbs (half the mass of a typical lead-acid unit). Finally, the titanium fuel tank (first of any mass-produced road bike) saves another 2.9 lbs but is protected by bodywork to reduce the chances of damage (but it also hides this work of art).

Technology

The electronics package on the new CBR1000RR SP is on par with all best-in-class options on the market. The rider-aid package includes ABS, 40g 6-axis IMU, nine-level traction control, slide control, wheelie control, rear wheel lift control, three-level engine braking, three-level quick shifter (up AND down including auto throttle blipping), fly-by-wire throttle with resistance feedback simulator built into the twist grip mechanism, and electronically-adjustable Ohlins suspension. The instrument panel uses a TFT display similar to that on the RCV213-S (and also suspiciously similar to that on the YZF-R1).

Ohlins has provided an extremely impressive package on the CBR1000RR SP for 2017. The 43mm NIX forks and TTX 36 rear shock are electronically controlled by the Ohlins S-EC system. The Bosch MM5.10 IMU (similar to the IMU on the Ducati 959 Panigale) sends real-time vehicle data to the suspension components to instantly optimize compression and damping through small servo motors. This extremely sophisticated system has been available on very few street-legal bikes to date such as the Yamaha YZF-R1M and Ducati Panigale R.

SP2 Racing Homologation Model

Honda has also announced that a CBR1000RR SP2 model will be made available for FIM homologation. The main differences between the SP and SP2 models are the engine head and wheels. The top end of the SP2 motor has 1 mm larger intake valves and 1.5 mm larger exhaust valves positioned at angles of 10 degrees and 12 degrees respectively. The wheels on the SP2 are forged aluminum Marchesini units for mass, aero and balance advantages. However, without proper race prep and tune, these upgraded wheels will be the only noticeable difference between the SP and SP2 models on the streets. The only reason street-legal versions of the SP2 are being produced is to qualify for the maximum number of racing series and classes; this is a race bike through and through.

HRC race parts and support will also be made available to SP2 owners, but only for those utilizing the bikes on professional race teams. This is an attempt to unlock the advantages of the new motor top end (through ECU flash, camshafts, etc) while keeping these non-EPA-approved modifications off of the street. This is why the US-spec RC213V-S had such disappointing power figures right out of the box when released, especially given the insane price point.

The RC213V-S was never intended to be an amazing streetbike, but instead a very capable platform from which to build a serious race bike. Regardless, the public perception did not care and the program ultimately suffered. The CBR1000RR SP2 program has a new strategy to avoid this distraction and focus on racing.

At least 500 SP2 units are to be built and sold globally over two years at an astonishing price of just $25,000. The CBR1000RR SP2 bike will first be made available for sale to race teams before being offered to the general public.

2017 CBR1000RR Availability

American Honda tells us the CBR1000RR SP will be available at dealerships beginning in the March/April 2017 timeframe. We suspect the entry-level CBR1000RR will share almost all parts with the SP model except the Ohlins suspension gear, titanium muffler and perhaps the TFT display at a price point around $16,000. What do you think?

rideapart.com

New 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP Review

– New 2017 CBR1000RR SP Review of Changes: Engine / Horsepower Increases, Frame & Suspension Details + More!  –

It’s finally official, Honda has let the cat out of the bag at the 2016 Intermot Motorcycle Show and released (2) new versions of the 2017 CBR1000RR Superbike! This page will go over the 2017 CBR1000RR SP whereas I’ll have a separate page that will go over all of the Specs & Changes to the 2017 CBR1000RR SP-2.

2017 CBR1000RR SP Model updates: The Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP goes to the next stage of Total Control. Power to weight ratio is improved by 14% – reaching the best level ever for the Fireblade – thanks to a 33lb (15kg) weight reduction and 11 horsepower (8kW) power boost. It’s also equipped with semi-active Öhlins Electronic Control suspension, plus Honda Selectable Torque Control, Selectable Engine Brake, new ABS, Quickshifter, Downshift Assist, Riding Mode Select System and Power Selector. RC213V-S MotoGP derived technology elevates the riding experience even further.

I know there’s a few key points and specs many of you guys will be looking for right off the bat so I’ll touch on them real quick…

Quick 17′ CBR1000RR SP / SP2 Spec Overview:

  • 2017 CBR1000RR SP Horsepower: 189 HP @ 13,000 RPM
  • 2017 CBR1000RR SP Torque: 85.6 LB/FT TQ @ 11,000 RPM
  • 2017 CBR1000RR SP Price / MSRP: $19,999 (base model $16,499)
  • 2017 CBR1000RR SP2 Price / MSRP: $24,999
  • 2017 CBR1000RR SP Release Date: March 2017
  • 2017 CBR1000RR SP2 Release Date: May 2017

2017 CBR1000RR SP VS CBR1000RR SP2 | What’s the Difference?

There’s some confusion as to the 2017 CBR1000RR SP VS CBR1000RR SP2 SO what the differences between the (2) 17′ CBR1000RR SP models are so let’s dive into that before we get any deeper into the specs of the ‘regular’ SP model.

CBR1000RR SP2 Model Updates / Differences: The CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2 is a road legal homologation special using the Fireblade SP as a base, ready for race use.

  • Marchesini wheels
  • Revised cylinder head: valves, combustion chambers and pistons
  • Racing kit to be available

Visually the carbon pattern insets and gold striping interwoven into the Tri-Color paint mark the Fireblade SP2’s difference over the ‘stock’ machine and gold Marchesini wheels (reducing front/rear wheel inertia by 18/9%) are another clue. But the real differences – and what gives the CBR1000RR SP2 ultimate racing potential – lie inside the engine and, in turn, the parts that can be added from the two race kits that will be available.

While the 76mm bore is identical to the SP, the Fireblade SP2 cylinder head runs 1mm larger 31.5mm diameter intake valves and 1.5mm larger 25.5mm diameter exhaust valves, with 10°/12° included valve intake/exhaust included valve angles (from 11°/11°). The valve pitches are identical, maintaining cylinder head width.

It runs the same 13.0:1 compression ratio but uses valve shapes and combustion chambers optimised for efficiency. Elongated spark plugs and a water jacket tightly wrapped around the combustion chambers improve cooling; this technology is derived directly from Honda’s RC213V MotoGP machine.

The pistons use an exclusive crown design with heat treatment that strengthens the area around the piston boss, which itself employs a 2.5mm shorter (and 8g lighter per cylinder) piston pin. Ready to house high-lift camshafts the outer diameter of the valve lifter has grown 2mm to 28mm, while total height and thickness have been reduced saving weight.

The CBR1000RR SP2’s electronic control devices are the same as those of the SP, with exclusive SP2 settings. For both race and general circuit use, a racing kit will be available.

  • Contents:
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Model overview
    • 3. Key features
    • 3.1 Chassis/electronics
    • 3.2 Chassis
    • 3.3 Engine/electronics
    • 3.4 Engine
    • 4. Quick overview of features & specs
    • 5. Technical specifications

1. 2017 CBR1000RR SP Introduction

1992. And something new stunned the motorcycling world. Radical thinking from Honda focused on the ratio between power and weight and the CBR900RR Fireblade arrived fully formed at the perfect balance point between the two.

Physically smaller and much more agile than the larger capacity competition, its four-cylinder engine also packed real punch. The Fireblade reset expectations of just what an open-class sports bike should be, and what it could do in an era when outright horsepower and straight-line speed had long held center stage.

Over the following 25 years the Fireblade has seen many changes and been through many evolutions – each underpinned by the concept of Total Control. Each generation has built on the legacy of the original Fireblade, providing a superbly balanced package that works incredibly well on track and, even more importantly, is both exhilarating and uniquely rewarding to ride out on the open road.

 

– 2017 CBR1000RR SP Video Review of Specs –

– 2017 CBR1000RR Video Review of Specs –

The fact the Fireblade is so good when actually raced on real roads – at the Isle of Man TT, for instance, where it is the most successful 1000cc machine ever with 23 wins to its name – is testament to its speed, handling and ability to perform in the most testing and extreme of ‘real world’ conditions.

2017, and the 25th anniversary of the Fireblade sees the introduction of a new CBR1000RR Fireblade SP. Honda’s engineers have remained true to the first principles of the original project – power to weight – with the focus on cornering, acceleration and braking. Thus the 17YM Fireblade SP is significantly lighter than the outgoing model, makes more power and is fully loaded with a cutting edge electronics package that underpins the project’s development concept of Next Stage Total Control.

It is everything that a Fireblade should be, and more.

Mr M. Sato, Large Project Leader (LPL) 17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

“All 1000cc sportsbikes are extraordinary examples of high performance engineering. But for us, for our new Fireblade we want extraordinary to be the pleasure of handling and controlling such a machine. Its true purpose – wherever it’s ridden – is to enjoy something that is not normally experienced in everyday life, something that cannot be surpassed.

The very first CBR900RR remains a milestone in our history, and an inspiration we have drawn on to radically reduce weight and increase power. And, to go to Next Stage Total Control, we have added an electronic control system that is there to support the rider, totally.

What then can our new Fireblade promise our customers? That is simple – the pure joy of riding.” 

CBR1000RR Fireblade SP – Next Stage Total Control

2. 2017 CBR1000RR SP Model Overview

Three factors are key to the essence of the new Fireblade SP; less weight, more power and electronics to help the rider wherever and however they’re riding.

The new electronic control system provides constant, selectable and fine-tunable rider support. Central to the system is the 5-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which measures exactly what the machine is doing, in every plane. It works the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) that precisely manages rear wheel traction via the FI-ECU and Throttle By Wire (TBW). The new ABS (also managed by the IMU) offers Rear Lift Control (RLC) and the ability for hard, safe trail braking into corners. Any difference measured between the front and rear wheel speeds engages Wheelie Control, depending on settings.

It also works with the Ohlins Objective Based Tuning Interface to adjust both the compression and rebound damping force of the semi-active Öhlins Electronic Control (S-EC) front fork and rear shock. For the rider this means access to a whole new level of handling ability, with suspension reaction – whether working through pre-sets or manual input – that delivers exactly the right amount of control in every situation. It functions as well on the road as it does the track, and for Honda a new era begins.

At the same time as the S-EC is working the suspension, the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) is precisely managing rear wheel traction through the IMU, FI-ECU and Throttle By Wire (TBW). It also delivers a Wheelie Control function.

Three standard display modes – Street, Circuit and Mechanic – provide all the information required for the rider relevant to the type of riding. The information displayed can be fine-tuned and adjusted while riding by using the left hand switch gear and TFT liquid crystal display, just as on the RC213V-S, Honda’s road going version of its RC213V MotoGP machine.

While the electronic control is very much a new departure for the Fireblade, the combination of the other two factors draws faithfully on the philosophy of the original 1992 machine: the optimal balance of power and weight. The engine revs harder and higher, with a much higher compression ratio and revised cam timing, and uses the TBW (a first for an inline four-cylinder Honda) and Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) which have been inspired by the technology developed for the RC213V-S

Bottom end torque and power are improved, with a significant increase in top-end power – up 11 horsepower (8kW) to 189 horsepower (141kW) @ 13,000rpm and 3 modes of engine output character can be chosen from. A Quickshifter is fitted as standard, as is Downshift Assist (with autoblipper) and new assist slipper clutch

Thanks to the use of magnesium and careful assessment and lightening of individual parts the engine also carries 4.4 lbs (2kg) less. The new titanium exhaust muffler saves further weight and aids mass centralization, as does the titanium petrol tank. Overall the CBR1000RR SP is 33 lbs (15kg) lighter than the outgoing model, with a wet weight of 429 lbs (195kg).

The twin-spar aluminum frame’s rigidity balance has been finely adjusted, and the swingarm is stiffer to match. A new rear subframe is lighter as are the redesigned wheels, while Brembo monobloc four-piston front brake calipers use high-performance track-ready brake pads.

The CBR1000RR SP ’s bodywork outlines an aggressive, functional minimalism, and the machine is slimmer and much more compact with a single seat unit fitted as standard. All lighting is LED and the stunning Tri-color paintwork – on a red base – harks back to Honda racing history.

3. 2017 CBR1000RR SP Key Features

3.1 Chassis/Electronics

  • • Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU)
  • • Öhlins Electronic Control (S-EC) suspension
  • • Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC)
  • • New ABS
  • • Riding Mode Select System (RMSS)

The Fireblade SP is the first Honda motorcycle to be equipped with Öhlins S-EC suspension front and rear: a 43mm NIX30 fork and TTX36 shock.

The Suspension Control Unit (SCU) receives roll rate, yaw rate and lean angle information from a 40g 5-axis (3-axis acceleration and 2-axis angular velocity) Bosch MM5.10 IMU gyro located close to the machine’s center of gravity. It also gathers wheel speed, engine rpm, brake input and throttle angle from the FI-ECU and, depending on the suspension mode selected by the rider delivers optimal compression and damping force (adjusted via each step motor) during normal riding, plus hard acceleration, braking and cornering.

There are three Active modes and three Manual modes for the rider to choose from. When set in Active, damping force is controlled and optimized to suit the riding conditions: A1 (’Fast’), A2 (‘Enjoy’) and A3 (‘Safety’). Within the Active Modes the rider can make finer adjustments. The Manual M1, M2 and M3 Modes allow any required adjustments to be made.

Within the electronic control system are a multitude of active features that many riders will find useful. The new ABS allows extremely hard braking while maintaining rear wheel contact with the ground, stopping the tendency for the rear of the machine to elevate or ‘back in’ around the front. It uses the 2-axis acceleration information from the IMU and calculates the acceleration of the machine’s center of gravity in the lift direction and acceleration perpendicular to that, using the front wheel as a grounding point.

ABS delivers smooth, effective braking into a corner. With information from the IMU, plus front and rear wheel speed sensors, the ABS Modulator controls braking force according to lean angle, even when panic braking. But it also allows for hard trail braking by using two parameters (deceleration derived from wheel speed and front/rear slip rates) plus lean angle to vary the threshold for ABS decompression. ABS delivers an extra sense of security when braking hard on the road, and offers a performance edge in certain conditions on the racetrack.

In isolation all the functions of the EBC – plus the HSTC’s wheelie control – perform specific, individual tasks. When tied together, however and working seamlessly as one they provide technological rider support that elevates the super sports experience, without turning the rider into the passenger. Next Stage Total Control, indeed.

Like the RC213V-S, the Fireblade SP uses a full-color TFT liquid crystal dash that clearly communicates information to the rider. It automatically adjust to ambient light, with a backlight of up to 1000 cd/m2 luminescence and features 3 modes; Street, Circuitand Mechanic, each displaying information most relevant for usage.

Street displays riding modes (1-3 and USER 1-2) plus the settings for each parameter P (Power), T (HSTC), EB (Selectable Engine Brake) and S (Suspension). Circuit adds in addition to Street mode the lap time, number of laps and difference from the best lap.Mechanic displays the digital tacho, gear position, grip angle, coolant temperature and battery voltage.

Riding mode 1 (FAST) gives full power, with linear throttle response, low HSTC and EB intervention and high damping force. Mode 2 (FUN) controls output through first to third gear, with fairly moderate power increase, medium HSTC, strong EB and medium damping force. Mode 3 (SAFE) controls output through first to fourth gear, with moderate power increase, high HSTC, strong EB and low damping force.

In the 2 USER modes all parameters can be combined and adjusted freely; riding modes, HSTC and suspension settings can be changed while riding from the up/down switch on the left switchgear.

The Shift-Up indicator is a horizontal line of 5 white LEDs located at the top; when engine speeds exceed user presets they go from solid to flashing. Displays include speedometer, tachometer, gear position, quickshifter, coolant temperature, riding distance and twin trip meters.

The onboard computer calculates instantaneous and average fuel economy, trip fuel consumption, average speed and time after last ignition plus remaining fuel after RES light and distance to empty (when selected). This information is shown on the bottom right of the screen. In the upper display, middle right the rider can choose to see the Shift-Up indicator setting speed, grip angle, battery voltage, calendar, or user-defined text.

Switching between modes is controlled by a mode switch on the right of the left hand switchgear. Just above it is an up/down switch that manages and changes the information displayed within the mode.

3.2 Chassis

  • • 429lb (195kg) wet weight
  • • Adjusted rigidity balance for the frame
  • • Stiffer swingarm
  • • Lighter subframe
  • • Titanium fuel tank
  • • Brembo four-piston radial mount monobloc brake calipers
  • • Redesigned wheels
  • • Minimal and aggressively styled bodywork

As a machine now a full 15kg lighter – with a wet weight of 195kg – and with 8kW power boost, the Fireblade’s physical handling has also been transformed. Rake and trail remain 23.3°/96mm but the hollow die-cast twin-spar aluminum frame’s rigidity balance has been significantly adjusted to give even sweeter handling with outstanding steering response, feel and stability.

Thinned frame walls save 300g. While transverse rigidity is unchanged, the frame is 10% more flexible in the torsional plane, which works to deliver a faster-reacting chassis. Yaw moment of inertia has been reduced by 15%; roll moment of inertia by10%. The Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD) unobtrusively maintains stability. To complement the frame changes the aluminum Unit Pro-Link swingarm’s hybrid structure has had the thickness of each section adjusted, saving approx. 100g while maintaining transverse rigidity and increasing torsional rigidity.

The die-cast aluminum subframe too has been redesigned and its thinner construction is at the same time highly rigid and 800g lighter – contributing to the concentration of mass and thus neutral handling feel with improved agility. Wheelbase is 1404mm; seat height is 820mm.

Positioned high the weight of the fuel tank (and fuel) plays a significant part in a motorcycle’s handling. In another first for mass production Honda has developed a compact 16L titanium fuel tank for the Fireblade SP. Manufactured by an ultra-deep drawing process, it’s 1.3kg lighter than an equivalent steel design and contributes to the concentration of mass and reduction in the moment of inertia.

Brembo four-piston monobloc radial mount brake calipers use newly developed high-mu (coefficient of friction) brake pads – these have a greater performance parameter at higher temperatures than standard pads, and suit aggressive ridng. The aluminum wheels are a new five Y-shape design, saving approx. 100g. Tire sizes are 120/70 R17 front and 190/50 R17 rear.

Minimal and dynamic are two words used to best describe the Fireblade SP ’s new styling. The design team wanted to create tightly compact proportions and the upper and middle fairing surfaces have been reduced in size as far as possible. Forward tilting character lines inject an aggressive attitude, with a focus on mechanical functionality, detail and quality of finish.

24mm in width has been squeezed from the upper fairing. Airflow control from the flow surfaces of the fairing, to the surface angle of the headlights and the contouring of their side slits supports stability at speed. In a racing crouch the rider is tucked well out of the airstream. In normal riding situations air pressure is evenly distributed on the rider’s shoulders, back and sides.

18mm has been saved across the middle fairing and its ‘knuckles’ double as RAD intake structures that pass discharged air around the outside, and underneath, the rider’s legs. The knee grip area is 15mm per side slimmer, with the interface between tank cover and the single seat unit athletically accentuated.

All lighting is crisp LED, with the twin front headlights offering high/low beam on both sides. Crowned with a sharply angled new logo, the Fireblade SP will be available in a Tri-Color paint option that uses red as its base (rather than white) and pays homage to Honda’s racing tradition and history. Wing-motif patterns underpin the machine’s exclusivity.

A 1kg Lithium-Ion battery saves weight (a lead-acid unit of similar output would weigh 2kg) and provides reliable and consistent electrical charge.

3.3 2017 CBR1000RR SP Engine/Electronics
  • • Throttle By Wire (TBW)
  • • Acceleration Position Sensor (APS)
  • • Power Selector
  • • Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU)
  • • 9 level Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC)
  • • Wheelie Control
  • • Selectable Engine Brake (SEB)
  • • Quickshifter
  • • Downshift Assist
  • • Riding Mode Select System (RMSS)

The 17YM Fireblade is the first inline four-cylinder engine from Honda to use Throttle by Wire (TBW) control. Derived and developed from the system used by the RC213V-S, its job is to put precise throttle control – and a very natural feel – in the rider’s right hand.

Heart of the system is a newly developed throttle grip Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) integrated into the right handlebar switchgear, which itself neatly mounts the engine start/stop switch – nothing more. APS converts movement of the grip into an electrical signal sent to the ECU, that then transmits it as an actuator signal to the TBW motor, achieving ideal throttle control relative to grip angle.

The return spring and other mechanisms inside the APS reproduce the initial play and natural feel of a cable, with throttle load set specifically for the Fireblade SP. Working in conjunction with the APS throttle bore is increased 2mm to 48mm (without increasing exterior width) and careful shaping of the intake funnels adds to the linear throttle response.

The Power Selector can be accessed through the Riding Mode Select System (RMSS). It offers 5 levels of output character: Level 1 give peak output in all six gears; Level 2 output is controlled in each gear to achieve smooth throttle feel under acceleration or deceleration; Level 5 has the strongest output control for most moderate throttle response. All levels have the same throttle response on initial opening.

Riding Mode (1) uses Level 1 as its preset, drawing out the full performance of the engine. Mode (2) uses Level 2, and is suitable for twisty roads, while Mode (3) goes to Level 5 for maximum security. Individual rider preferences can also be input manually through the USER 1 and 2 interface.

The Fireblade employs an enhanced version of the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) used on the RC213V-S. It controls engine torque via two sensing methods – the first uses wheel speed sensors to measure and compare front and rear wheel speeds. When the FI-ECU detects rear wheel acceleration (and front wheel deceleration) it reduces the TBW throttle position, and thus output, keeping the front wheel on the ground. Maximum application of the throttle is thus possible without fear of wheelies, with the support of Wheelie Control.

The second sensing function detects machine roll angle. The IMU located under the seat detects rotational speed in the chassis’ roll and yaw directions, and acceleration in the longitudinal, lateral and vertical directions. It then calculates roll angle to control engine torque, maintaining rear wheel traction at the required level. The body roll calculation logic used by the ECU uses the same attitude detection technologies developed for Honda’s ASIMO humanoid robot, enabling the most precise calculation possible.

Nine intervention levels (plus off) are offered by HSTC to suit rider preferences, and the Riding Modes USER 1 and 2 enable individual changes to be made while moving.

There is also a Selectable Engine Brake (SEB) system to change engine-braking character to match rider preference and a range of conditions. Level 1 offers the highest braking force, Level 3 the lowest. The preset Modes 1, 2 and 3 use recommended settings, but through USER 1 and 2 can be set individually.

A Quickshifter is fitted as standard for clutchless upshifts and works through fuel injection cut and ignition retard. It has 3 settings plus off. Downshift Assist allows clutchless downshifts, and also works via fuel injection cut and ignition retard with TBW autoblipping. It too has 3 settings plus off.

3.4 2017 CBR1000RR SP Engine
  • • 11 Horsepower (8kW) power increase
    • 2017 CBR1000RR SP Horsepower – 189 HP @ 13,000 RPM
    • 2017 CBR1000RR SP Torque – 85.6 ft/lb @ 11,000 RPM
  • • Revised valve lift and cam timing
  • • Magnesium covers and detail redesign saves 2kg
  • • 4-2-1 exhaust with titanium muffler
  • • Redesigned downshift assist
  • • New assist slipper clutch

Honda’s engineers exhaustively re-examined the Fireblade’s 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine to make it as light and powerful as possible. The result of the work is an extra 8kW, the loss of 2kg and raised rev ceiling of 13,000rpm.

Peak power on the 2017 CBR1000RR SP comes in at 189 horsepower (141kW) @ 13,000rpm, with peak torque coming in at 85.6 ft/lb (116Nm) delivered @ 11,000 10,500rpm. Bore and stroke remain 76 x 55.1mm but compression ratio is up from 12.3:1 to 13:1. This is an engine in a very high state of tune and the crankshaft, valve train and transmission all use higher specification materials than the previous design.

The pistons feature an optimized wall thickness and a new crown design to raise the compression; the surface finishing of the piston-ring grooves has also been modified to improve sealing performance and efficiency. Valve lift and cam timing has been revised to match the higher rpm and greater engine performance.

Power up is just one part of the Fireblade SP ’s story – reduced weight is another. So every part of the engine was scrutinised to see if it could be made lighter. All the engine covers are redesigned (clutch cover is aluminum; the ignition cover magnesium) and the length of the bolts, water hose and water hose bands have been reduced.

With a revised, rounded shape the radiator is 30mm narrower in overall width and 100g lighter (including a 30cc reduction in water capacity). Using a new high-density core it achieves identical heat dissipation and contributes to the slimmer frontal area of the fairing cowls.

The assist slipper clutch is completely revised with a single die-cast pressure plate and clutch center, and offers reduced load at the lever. For downshifts the slipper functionality remains the same as before but aluminum cam parts (instead of steel) save weight. The gap between the accelerating and decelerating cams has also been optimized, again improving lever feel when changing gear. All of the transmission gears have been pared down to save weight.

The titanium irregular cross-section muffler is 2.8kg lighter and minimizes the center of gravity change; it also creates an unmistakable sound tone from the exhaust on an open throttle. The exhaust supplier to the Repsol Honda MotoGP team was asked to develop the prototype and produced an exquisite design with the 4-2-1 double-skinned downpipes incorporating the exhaust valve within the first main pipe.

4. 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP / SP2 Quick Overview of Features:

  • Full LED Lighting PackageHeadlights, tail lights, turn signals—the CBR1000RR SP’s have a full street-legal lighting package, and it’s all done with lightweight, efficient, cool LEDs.
  • New Öhlins Smart EC SuspensionThe CBR1000RR SP and SP2 feature a new Öhlins Smart EC suspension system. It’s fully adjustable, semi-active, truly premium and track-ready — a huge upgrade from what you’d normally find on a streetbike.
  • New Gyro-Assisted ABSEvery new CBR1000RR SP and SP2 comes standard with anti-lock brakes. But these brakes go one better, including rear-wheel lift control (think hard stopping here), along with a special cornering program that takes lean angle into account.
  • Brembo Monobloc Front CalipersThe CBR1000RR SP’s race-proven, radial-mount Brembo monobloc calipers are light, but they provide exceptional stiffness and excellent braking performance.
  • Improved Radiator DesignAlmost an inch narrower and 100 grams lighter than last year’s model, the new radiator tucks in tighter and cools just as efficiently.
  • Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD)Most steering dampers only sense handlebar-deflection speed. The Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD) is way more sophisticated. It also detects vehicle speed, and adjusts damping proportionally. That helps maintain low-speed maneuverability while providing excellent, predictable high-speed handling.
  • New Thin Film Transfer DisplayTFT means an instrument display that’s lighter and easier to read than previous LCD designs. It’s a first for Honda, and it’s making its premier on the new 2017 CBR1000RR’s.
  • Dual-Stage Fuel InjectionThe CBR1000RRs feature two sets of injectors per cylinder for both low- and high-rpm performance, instantaneous high-rpm response and great low-rpm metering and clean running. Refined EFI settings make the engine even more manageable, with smoother throttle response specifically at smaller throttle openings.
  • Improved Twin-Spar Aluminum ChassisBy thinning the sidewalls in the frame’s twin spars, we’ve fine-tuned the chassis responsiveness, especially at aggressive angles. At the same time, we made the swingarm ten percent more torsionally rigid.
  • Assisted Slipper ClutchSuperbikes can deliver a great deal of back-torque through the driveline, upsetting handling—not the CBR1000RR models. Its Honda-designed assisted slipper clutch is the same type used on our MotoGP bikes. The design does away with the need for heavy clutch springs, ensuring full power transmission with smooth shifting and a light clutch pull at the lever.
  • Centrally Located Fuel TankThe CBR1000RR SP and SP2 feature a radical, new thin-wall titanium fuel tank. Filled to capacity, the tank is almost four and a half pounds lighter, but still offers plenty of operational range.
  • Slimmer ErgonomicsThe new CBR1000RRs are much slimmer in the tank/seat junction area, and also in the upper cowl (more than 12mm trimmer per side). This improves aerodynamics, and the narrow tank makes it easier to tuck in.
  • Lightweight Sub-FrameAlmost a full pound lighter than our previous models, the new CBR1000RR sub-frame further refines our mass centralization efforts. Light is always right, and the new CBR1000RRs offer Superbike performance in a package that weighs no more than a typical 600 Supersport.
  • Lithium Ion BatteryLight and compact, the new CBR1000RR SP and SP2 come standard with a high-tech lithium-ion battery.
  • Titanium MufflerMotoGP bikes use titanium for their mufflers, and so do the new CBR1000RR SP and SP2. It’s a significant weight savings.
  • Premium WheelsYou’ll notice that the new CBR1000RR SP features new five-spoke wheels. They’re light and strong—more than a pound lighter than the previous six-spoke wheels. The SP2 offers an even more impressive upgrade: lightweight, premium Marchesini wheels.

2017 CBR1000RR SP2 Photo Gallery / Pictures

5. 2017 CBR1000RR SP Technical Specifications

ENGINE
Type Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 16-valve DOHC Inline-4
Engine Displacement (cm³) 999cc
No. of Valves per Cylinder 4
Bore ´ Stroke (mm) 76 x 55
Compression Ratio 13:01
Max. Power Output 189 HP / 141kW @ 13,000rpm
Max. Torque 85.6 FT/LB (116Nm) @ 11,000rpm
Oil Capacity 3.4L
FUEL SYSTEM
Carburation PGM-DSFI
Fuel Tank Capacity 16L
Fuel Consumption TBC
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Starter Electric
Battery Capacity 12V-4.5AH(Li-ion)
ACG Output 0.42kw
DRIVETRAIN
Clutch Type Wet, multiplate clutch
Transmission Type 6-speed
Final Drive Chain
FRAME
Type Diamond; aluminum composite twin spar
CHASSIS
Dimensions (LxWxH) 2,065mm x 715mm x 1125mm
Wheelbase 1404mm
Caster Angle 23.3°
Trail 96mm
Seat Height 32.2 in (820mm)
Ground Clearance 129mm
Curb Weight 429 lbs (195 kg)
Turning radius
SUSPENSION
Type Front Telescopic inverted fork with an inner tube diameter of 43mm, and a NIX30 Smart-EC (OHLINS) Front Fork with preload, compression and rebound adjustments, 120mm stroke
Type Rear Unit Pro-Link with gas-charged TTX36 Smart-EC (Öhlins) damper featuring preload and compression and rebound damping adjustment, 60mm stroke
WHEELS
Rim Size Front 17 inch
Rim Size Rear 17 inch
tires Front 120/70ZR17 58W
tires Rear 190/50ZR17 73W
BRAKES
ABS System Type 2 Channel
INSTRUMENTS & ELECTRICS
Instruments TFT-LCD
Security System HISS
Headlight LED
Taillight LED

All specifications are provisional and subject to change without notice.

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