Honda cbr1000rr fireblade sp version


2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP + SP2 -

2017 Honda Fireblade SP2

Honda is back. And back with two banging versions of an all-new Fireblade SP to celebrate this iconic steed’s 25th anniversary: a more basic ‘stock’ version (SP) and the SP2, which is, essentially, a homologation racing special complete with Marchesini rims, a revised cylinder head and a racing kit as an optional extra, reviving another iconic Honda name in the process. Both bikes feature…

  • 189bhp (+11bhp)
  • 15kg lighter at 195kg (kerb)
  • Power-to-weight ratio improved by 14%
  • Öhlins semi-active suspension
  • Bosch MM5.10 5-axis Inertial Measurement Unit
  • Engine braking control
  • Quickshifter/auto-blipper
  • Traction control
  • Titanium fuel tank
  • Brembo Monoblocs
  • Cornering ABS

Ultimately, this is the fundamental package that any 2017 superbike should boast. Unyielding ‘Blade aficionados may be disappointed to learn there’s no V4 motor, instead opting for tweaking its predecessor’s lump. In fact, in many ways, it’s a case of ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,’ as much of the old bike’s base remains – just garnished with oodles of contemporary gadgets, technology and some rather sexy aesthetics that also ensure the ’17 RR is far sleeker and slimmer.

Still competitive in racing and nevertheless selling by the ton in its current guise, the ‘Blade has remained (virtually) unchanged since 2008. After sticking to the ‘Total Control’ mantra and zero electronic intervention, 2017 sees a raft of gizmos aboard the Fireblade – its foundation being a Bosch IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) – and now Honda dubs this new era as ‘Next Stage Total Control.’ A play on contradiction, you could say…

Mr Sato, the SP’s Project Leader, reckons that, “its true purpose – wherever it’s ridden – is to enjoy something that is not normally experienced in everyday life, something that cannot be surpassed.” Amen to that, brother. Other than more power, less weight, and an arsenal of electronics, here’s what you need to know about the 2017 Honda Fireblade SP.

Engine: The 999cc inline four retains the 76mm x 55.1mm bore and stroke figure of the previous motor, though Honda has increased power and trimmed 2kg of weight by tinkering internally and upping compression to 13:1. Honda claim 189bhp @ 13,000rpm, which should equate to 170bhp at the rear wheel – on par with any other Euro4-compliant superbike so far. Bottom-end torque has also been improved, with peak figures stated as 116Nm @ 11,000rpm.

Valve lift and cam timing has been revised, and the crank, transmission and valvetrain all use higher spec’ materials to cope with extra power, more revs and its superior state of tune. The pistons are also redesigned and feature a new crown that helps the higher compression ratio.

An assortment of magnesium is used to shift mass, as is aluminium. The exhaust – with a can that looks suspiciously like the R1’s stock item – is titanium and contributes to the overall weight loss. The radiator is 30mm narrower and 100g lighter, and Honda went as far as shortening bolt lengths to trim mass.

There’s a new slipper clutch to work alongside electronic engine braking control and an auto-blipper, which means the 2017 Fireblade SP is the first Honda inline four to brag ride-by-wire, or Throttle-by-Wire (TBW) as Honda’s TLA (Three Letter Acronym) suggests. The more Gucci SP2 uses the SP’s motor as a base, but with a revised cylinder head (pistons, valves and combustion chambers) and elongated spark plugs among other trinkets.

Chassis: The aluminium twin-spar frame uses identical rake and trail numbers from previously (23.3°/96mm), although the rigidity balance of the frame has been adjusted and there’s a stiffer swingarm and lighter subframe. Honda reckons the frame is 10% more flexible in torsional plane, which supplies a more reactive chassis. Likewise, the wheelbase has been reduced to 1,404mm.

A lot of work has been carried out to the fuel tank – which is now titanium and just 16L – and the positioning of its weight. Four-piston Brembo Monoblocs supply braking power and surprisingly, yet unsurprisingly, Honda has opted to grace the rear wheel with a 190/50 section tyre.

Öhlins Electronic Control (S-EC) suspension is used and comes with NIX30 forks and a TTX36 shock, taking roll, yaw and lean angle data from the Bosch IMU (as well as wheel speeds, RPM, and throttle input) and altering damping on the fly. As with previous Öhlins semi-active suspension seen on other bikes, there are three manual modes and three automatic modes.

The ‘stock’ SP…

Electronics: Are you ready for some more acronyms? Good, now settle down. The aforementioned 5-axis Bosch IMU gathers a mass of data to consequently allow fine-tuning and lean angle functionality of traction control, anti-wheelie and cornering ABS. being 5-axis, there’s no sign of any slide control or similar heroics. As previously stated, this is the first Honda four-pot to use ride-by-wire and the Big H has taken tricknology from the RC213V-S by furnishing the new Fireblade with an Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) that converts throttle tube movement into a signal sent to the ECU. Posh ride-by-wire in essence.

Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) is Honda’s version of traction control and offers nine different levels of intrusion, plus off. There are five options of power output (all with the same throttle response during initial opening), three levels of engine braking and even the quickshifter/blipper has varying choices. Important for some, all of which can be altered on the hoof via the switchgear and the SP’s full-colour TFT dash automatically adjusts to ambient lighting.

There are three riding modes: Mode 1 is dubbed ‘FAST’ and supplies a linear throttle response, low levels of traction control and engine braking intervention, and stiffer damping force. Mode 2 (FUN) culls output in the first three gears and electronic intervention is set at medium levels. SAFE is Mode 3 and control power in the first four gears. Yep, you guessed it: high levels of electronic intervention and softer damping. You also get two ‘User’ modes to dial in personal preferences.

More on prices, availability and other guff when we get it.

 

44teeth.com

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP
2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Check out the even higher specification 2017 Honda Fireblade SP2 Here

The Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP goes to the next stage of Total Control. Power to weight ratio is improved by 14% – reaching the best level ever for the Fireblade – thanks to a 15kg weight reduction and 8kW power boost.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

It’s also equipped with semi-active Öhlins Electronic Control suspension, plus Honda Selectable Torque Control, Selectable Engine Brake, new ABS, Quickshifter, Downshift Assist, Riding Mode Select System and Power Selector. RC213V-S MotoGP derived technology elevates the riding experience even further.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Honda shocked the sportsbike world in 1992 when they focused on the ratio between power and weight and the CBR900RR Fireblade arrived fully formed at the perfect balance point between the two. Physically smaller and much more agile than the larger capacity competition, its four-cylinder engine also packed real punch. The Fireblade reset expectations of just what an open-class sports bike should be, and what it could do in an era when outright horsepower and straight-line speed had long held centre stage.

The fact the Fireblade is so good when actually raced on real roads – at the Isle of Man TT, for instance, where it is the most successful 1000cc machine ever with 23 wins to its name – is testament to its speed, handling and ability to perform in the most testing and extreme of ‘real world’ conditions. And right here in Australia the Fireblade SP took out the 2015 Swann Australasian Superbike Championship, then backed that up this year with Troy Herfoss winning the 2016 ASBK Championship.

2017, and the 25th anniversary of the Fireblade sees the introduction of a new CBR1000RR Fireblade SP. Honda’s engineers have remained true to the first principles of the original project – power to weight – with the focus on cornering, acceleration and braking. Thus the 2017 Honda Fireblade SP is significantly lighter than the outgoing model, makes more power and is fully loaded with a cutting edge electronics package that underpins the project’s development concept of Next Stage Total Control.

Mr M. Sato, Large Project Leader (LPL) 17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

“All 1000cc sportsbikes are extraordinary examples of high performance engineering. But for us, for our new Fireblade we want extraordinary to be the pleasure of handling and controlling such a machine. Its true purpose – wherever it’s ridden – is to enjoy something that is not normally experienced in everyday life, something that cannot be surpassed. The very first CBR900RR remains a milestone in our history, and an inspiration we have drawn on to radically reduce weight and increase power. And, to go to Next Stage Total Control, we have added an electronic control system that is there to support the rider, totally. What then can our new Fireblade promise our customers? That is simple – the pure joy of riding.”

CBR1000RR Fireblade SP – Next Stage Total Control
2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Three factors are key to the essence of the new Fireblade SP; less weight, more power and electronics to help the rider wherever and however they’re riding.

The new electronic control system provides constant, selectable and fine-tunable rider support. Central to the system is the 5-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which measures exactly what the machine is doing, in every plane. It works the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) that precisely manages rear wheel traction via the FI-ECU and Throttle By Wire (TBW). The new ABS (also managed by the IMU) offers Rear Lift Control (RLC) and the ability for hard, safe trail braking into corners. Any difference measured between the front and rear wheel speeds engages Wheelie Control, depending on settings.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

It also works with the Ohlins Objective Based Tuning Interface to adjust both the compression and rebound damping force of the semi-active Öhlins Electronic Control (S-EC) front fork and rear shock. For the rider this means access to a whole new level of handling ability, with suspension reaction – whether working through pre-sets or manual input – that delivers exactly the right amount of control in every situation. It functions as well on the road as it does the track, and for Honda a new era begins.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

At the same time as the S-EC is working the suspension, the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) is precisely managing rear wheel traction through the IMU, FI-ECU and Throttle By Wire (TBW). It also delivers a Wheelie Control function.

Three standard display modes – Street, Circuit and Mechanic – provide all the information required for the rider relevant to the type of riding. The information displayed can be fine-tuned and adjusted while riding by using the left hand switch gear and TFT liquid crystal display, just as on the RC213V-S, Honda’s road going version of its RC213V MotoGP machine.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

While the electronic control is very much a new departure for the Fireblade, the combination of the other two factors draws faithfully on the philosophy of the original 1992 machine: the optimal balance of power and weight. The engine revs harder and higher, with a much higher compression ratio and revised cam timing, and uses the TBW (a first for an inline four-cylinder Honda) and Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) which have been inspired by the technology developed for the RC213V-S.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Bottom end torque and power are improved, with a significant increase in top-end power – up 8kW to 141kW @13,000rpm and 3 modes of engine output character can be chosen from. A Quickshifter is fitted as standard, as is Downshift Assist (with autoblipper) and new assist slipper clutch

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Thanks to the use of magnesium and careful assessment and lightening of individual parts the engine also carries 2kg less. The new titanium exhaust muffler saves further weight and aids mass centralisation, as does the titanium petrol tank. Overall the Fireblade SP is 15kg lighter than the outgoing model, with a wet weight of 195kg.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

The twin-spar aluminium frame’s rigidity balance has been finely adjusted, and the swingarm is stiffer to match. A new rear subframe is lighter as are the redesigned wheels, while Brembo monobloc four-piston front brake calipers use high-performance track-ready brake pads.

The Fireblade SP ’s bodywork outlines an aggressive, functional minimalism, and the machine is slimmer and much more compact with a single seat unit fitted as standard. All lighting is LED and the stunning Tri-Colour paintwork – on a red base – harks back to Honda racing history.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

 

The Fireblade SP is the first Honda motorcycle to be equipped with Öhlins S-EC suspension front and rear: a 43mm NIX30 fork and TTX36 shock.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

The Suspension Control Unit (SCU) receives roll rate, yaw rate and lean angle information from a 40g 5-axis (3-axis acceleration and 2-axis angular velocity) Bosch MM5.10 IMU gyro located close to the machine’s centre of gravity. It also gathers wheel speed, engine rpm, brake input and throttle angle from the FI-ECU and, depending on the suspension mode selected by the rider delivers optimal compression and damping force (adjusted via each step motor) during normal riding, plus hard acceleration, braking and cornering.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

There are three Active modes and three Manual modes for the rider to choose from. When set in Active, damping force is controlled and optimised to suit the riding conditions: A1 (’Fast’), A2 (‘Enjoy’) and A3 (‘Safety’). Within the Active Modes the rider can make finer adjustments. The Manual M1, M2 and M3 Modes allow any required adjustments to be made.

Within the electronic control system are a multitude of active features that many riders will find useful. The new ABS allows extremely hard braking while maintaining rear wheel contact with the ground, stopping the tendency for the rear of the machine to elevate or ‘back in’ around the front. It uses the 2-axis acceleration information from the IMU and calculates the acceleration of the machine’s centre of gravity in the lift direction and acceleration perpendicular to that, using the front wheel as a grounding point.

ABS delivers smooth, effective braking into a corner. With information from the IMU, plus front and rear wheel speed sensors, the ABS Modulator controls braking force according to lean angle, even when panic braking. But it also allows for hard trail braking by using two parameters (deceleration derived from wheel speed and front/rear slip rates) plus lean angle to vary the threshold for ABS decompression. ABS delivers an extra sense of security when braking hard on the road, and offers a performance edge in certain conditions on the racetrack.

In isolation all the functions of the EBC – plus the HSTC’s wheelie control – perform specific, individual tasks. When tied together, however and working seamlessly as one they provide technological rider support that elevates the super sports experience, without turning the rider into the passenger. Next Stage Total Control, indeed.

Like the RC213V-S, the Fireblade SP uses a full-colour TFT liquid crystal dash that clearly communicates information to the rider. It automatically adjust to ambient light, with a backlight of up to 1000 cd/m2 luminescence and features 3 modes; Street, Circuit and Mechanic, each displaying information most relevant for usage.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Street displays riding modes (1-3 and USER 1-2) plus the settings for each parameter P (Power), T (HSTC), EB (Selectable Engine Brake) and S (Suspension). Circuit adds in addition to Street mode the lap time, number of laps and difference from the best lap. Mechanic displays the digital tacho, gear position, grip angle, coolant temperature and battery voltage.

Riding mode 1 (FAST) gives full power, with linear throttle response, low HSTC and EB intervention and high damping force. Mode 2 (FUN) controls output through first to third gear, with fairly moderate power increase, medium HSTC, strong EB and medium damping force. Mode 3 (SAFE) controls output through first to fourth gear, with moderate power increase, high HSTC, strong EB and low damping force.

In the 2 USER modes all parameters can be combined and adjusted freely; riding modes, HSTC and suspension settings can be changed while riding from the up/down switch on the left switchgear.

The Shift-Up indicator is a horizontal line of 5 white LEDs located at the top; when engine speeds exceed user presets they go from solid to flashing. Displays include speedometer, tachometer, gear position, quickshifter, coolant temperature, riding distance and twin trip meters.

The onboard computer calculates instantaneous and average fuel economy, trip fuel consumption, average speed and time after last ignition plus remaining fuel after RES light and distance to empty (when selected). This information is shown on the bottom right of the screen. In the upper display, middle right the rider can choose to see the Shift-Up indicator setting speed, grip angle, battery voltage, calendar, or user-defined text.

Switching between modes is controlled by a mode switch on the right of the left hand switchgear. Just above it is an up/down switch that manages and changes the information displayed within the mode.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

 

As a machine now a full 15kg lighter – with a wet weight of 195kg – and with 8kW power boost, the Fireblade’s physical handling has also been transformed. Rake and trail remain 23.3°/96mm but the hollow die-cast twin-spar aluminium frame’s rigidity balance has been significantly adjusted to give even sweeter handling with outstanding steering response, feel and stability.

Thinned frame walls save 300g. While transverse rigidity is unchanged, the frame is 10% more flexible in the torsional plane, which works to deliver a faster-reacting chassis. Yaw moment of inertia has been reduced by 15%; roll moment of inertia by10%. The Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD) unobtrusively maintains stability. To complement the frame changes the aluminium Unit Pro-Link swingarm’s hybrid structure has had the thickness of each section adjusted, saving approx. 100g while maintaining transverse rigidity and increasing torsional rigidity.

The die-cast aluminium subframe too has been redesigned and its thinner construction is at the same time highly rigid and 800g lighter – contributing to the concentration of mass and thus neutral handling feel with improved agility. Wheelbase is 1404mm; seat height is 820mm.

Positioned high the weight of the fuel tank (and fuel) plays a significant part in a motorcycle’s handling. In another first for mass production Honda has developed a compact 16L titanium fuel tank for the Fireblade SP. Manufactured by an ultra-deep drawing process, it’s 1.3kg lighter than an equivalent steel design and contributes to the concentration of mass and reduction in the moment of inertia.

Brembo four-piston monobloc radial mount brake calipers use newly developed high-mu (coefficient of friction) brake pads – these have a greater performance parameter at higher temperatures than standard pads, and suit aggressive ridng. The aluminium wheels are a new five Y-shape design, saving approx. 100g. Tyre sizes are 120/70 R17 front and 190/50 R17 rear.

Minimal and dynamic are two words used to best describe the Fireblade SP ’s new styling. The design team wanted to create tightly compact proportions and the upper and middle fairing surfaces have been reduced in size as far as possible. Forward tilting character lines inject an aggressive attitude, with a focus on mechanical functionality, detail and quality of finish.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

24mm in width has been squeezed from the upper fairing. Airflow control from the flow surfaces of the fairing, to the surface angle of the headlights and the contouring of their side slits supports stability at speed. In a racing crouch the rider is tucked well out of the airstream. In normal riding situations air pressure is evenly distributed on the rider’s shoulders, back and sides.

18mm has been saved across the middle fairing and its ‘knuckles’ double as RAD intake structures that pass discharged air around the outside, and underneath, the rider’s legs. The knee grip area is 15mm per side slimmer, with the interface between tank cover and the single seat unit athletically accentuated.

All lighting is crisp LED, with the twin front headlights offering high/low beam on both sides. Crowned with a sharply angled new logo, the Fireblade SP will be available in a Tricolour paint option that uses red as its base (rather than white) and pays homage to Honda’s racing tradition and history. Wing-motif patterns underpin the machine’s exclusivity.

A 1kg Lithium-Ion battery saves weight (a lead-acid unit of similar output would weigh 2kg) and provides reliable and consistent electrical charge.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

 

The 17YM Fireblade is the first inline four-cylinder engine from Honda to use Throttle by Wire (TBW) control. Derived and developed from the system used by the RC213V-S, its job is to put precise throttle control – and a very natural feel – in the rider’s right hand.

Heart of the system is a newly developed throttle grip Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) integrated into the right handlebar switchgear, which itself neatly mounts the engine start/stop switch – nothing more. APS converts movement of the grip into an electrical signal sent to the ECU, that then transmits it as an actuator signal to the TBW motor, achieving ideal throttle control relative to grip angle.

The return spring and other mechanisms inside the APS reproduce the initial play and natural feel of a cable, with throttle load set specifically for the Fireblade SP. Working in conjunction with the APS throttle bore is increased 2mm to 48mm (without increasing exterior width) and careful shaping of the intake funnels adds to the linear throttle response.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

The Power Selector can be accessed through the Riding Mode Select System (RMSS). It offers 5 levels of output character: Level 1 give peak output in all six gears; Level 2 output is controlled in each gear to achieve smooth throttle feel under acceleration or deceleration; Level 5 has the strongest output control for most moderate throttle response. All levels have the same throttle response on initial opening.

Riding Mode (1) uses Level 1 as its preset, drawing out the full performance of the engine. Mode (2) uses Level 2, and is suitable for twisty roads, while Mode (3) goes to Level 5 for maximum security. Individual rider preferences can also be input manually through the USER 1 and 2 interface.

The Fireblade employs an enhanced version of the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) used on the RC213V-S. It controls engine torque via two sensing methods – the first uses wheel speed sensors to measure and compare front and rear wheel speeds. When the FI-ECU detects rear wheel acceleration (and front wheel deceleration) it reduces the TBW throttle position, and thus output, keeping the front wheel on the ground. Maximum application of the throttle is thus possible without fear of wheelies, with the support of Wheelie Control.

The second sensing function detects machine roll angle. The IMU located under the seat detects rotational speed in the chassis’ roll and yaw directions, and acceleration in the longitudinal, lateral and vertical directions. It then calculates roll angle to control engine torque, maintaining rear wheel traction at the required level. The body roll calculation logic used by the ECU uses the same attitude detection technologies developed for Honda’s ASIMO humanoid robot, enabling the most precise calculation possible.

Nine intervention levels (plus off) are offered by HSTC to suit rider preferences, and the Riding Modes USER 1 and 2 enable individual changes to be made while moving.

There is also a Selectable Engine Brake (SEB) system to change engine-braking character to match rider preference and a range of conditions. Level 1 offers the highest braking force, Level 3 the lowest. The preset Modes 1, 2 and 3 use recommended settings, but through USER 1 and 2 can be set individually.

A Quickshifter is fitted as standard for clutchless upshifts and works through fuel injection cut and ignition retard. It has 3 settings plus off. Downshift Assist allows clutchless downshifts, and also works via fuel injection cut and ignition retard with TBW autoblipping. It too has 3 settings plus off.

Engine
  • * 8kW power increase
  • * Revised valve lift and cam timing
  • * Magnesium covers and detail redesign saves 2kg
  • * 4-2-1 exhaust with titanium muffler
  • * Redesigned downshift assist
  • * New assist slipper clutch
2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Honda’s engineers exhaustively re-examined the Fireblade’s 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine to make it as light and powerful as possible. The result of the work is an extra 8kW, the loss of 2kg and raised rev ceiling of 13,000rpm.

Peak power is 141kW @ 13,000rpm, with peak torque of 116Nm delivered @ 11,000rpm. Bore and stroke remain 76 x 55.1mm but compression ratio is up from 12.3:1 to 13:1. This is an engine in a very high state of tune and the crankshaft, valve train and transmission all use higher specification materials than the previous design.

The pistons feature an optimised wall thickness and a new crown design to raise the compression; the surface finishing of the piston-ring grooves has also been modified to improve sealing performance and efficiency. Valve lift and cam timing has been revised to match the higher rpm and greater engine performance.

2017 Honda Fireblade SP

Power up is just one part of the Fireblade SP ’s story – reduced weight is another. So every part of the engine was scrutinised to see if it could be made lighter. All the engine covers are redesigned (clutch cover is aluminium; the ignition cover magnesium) and the length of the bolts, water hose and water hose bands have been reduced.

With a revised, rounded shape the radiator is 30mm narrower in overall width and 100g lighter (including a 30cc reduction in water capacity). Using a new high-density core it achieves identical heat dissipation and contributes to the slimmer frontal area of the fairing cowls.

The assist slipper clutch is completely revised with a single die-cast pressure plate and clutch centre, and offers reduced load at the lever. For downshifts the slipper functionality remains the same as before but aluminium cam parts (instead of steel) save weight. The gap between the accelerating and decelerating cams has also been optimised, again improving lever feel when changing gear. All of the transmission gears have been pared down to save weight.

The titanium irregular cross-section muffler is 2.8kg lighter and minimises the centre of gravity change; it also creates an unmistakable sound tone from the exhaust on an open throttle. The exhaust supplier to the Repsol Honda MotoGP team was asked to develop the prototype and produced an exquisite design with the 4-2-1 double-skinned downpipes incorporating the exhaust valve within the first main pipe.

2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP Technical Specifications
  • Engine – 999cc, Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 16-valve DOHC Inline-4
  • Bore ´ Stroke (mm) – 76 x 55
  • Compression Ratio – 13:01
  • Max. Power Output – 141kW/ 189hp 13,000rpm
  • Max. Torque – 116Nm/11,000rpm
  • Oil Capacity – 3.4L
  • Induction – PGM-DSFI
  • Fuel Tank Capacity – 16L
  • Frame – Diamond; aluminium composite twin spar
  • Dimensions (LxWxH) 2,065mm x 715mm x 1125mm
  • Wheelbase – 1404mm
  • Caster Angle – 23.3°
  • Trail – 96mm
  • Seat Height – 820mm
  • Ground Clearance – 129mm
  • Kerb Weight – 195kg
  • Front Suspension – Telescopic inverted fork with an inner tube diameter of 43mm, and a NIX30 Smart-EC (OHLINS) Front Fork with preload, compression and rebound adjustments, 120mm stroke
  • Rear Suspension – Unit Pro-Link with gas-charged TTX36 Smart-EC (Öhlins) damper featuring preload and compression and rebound damping adjustment, 60mm stroke
  • Tyres – 120/70ZR17 58W (F) – 190/50ZR17 73W (R)
  • Brakes – 2 Channel ABS
2017 Honda Fireblade SP

 

www.mcnews.com.au

New Honda Fireblade | Visordown

THERE HAS been lots of rumour and speculation about what to expect from the next-generation Honda Fireblade but in a press conference at the Intermot show in Germany, Honda today unveiled its new CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and the homologation special SP2.

Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

 

Key information:

  • Ohlins semi-active suspension
  • Inertial measurement unit and a full suite of electronics
  • Cornering ABS
  • Quickshifter and downshift assist
  • RC213V-S derived traction control
  • Inertial measurement unit
  • Riding and power modes

 

Since the ‘Blade was last updated, superbikes have become increasingly more powerful and technologically advanced, so it’s not surprising that the latest incarnation of Honda’s flagship sports bike sees the Fireblade gaining a comprehensive suite of electronics.

Honda says its main focus when developing the 2017 Fireblade was power-to-weight, which were principles of the original ‘Blade, released 25 years ago. It says the focus on this machine has been cornering, acceleration and braking. Here it is in more detail:

 

Engine

The Fireblade is still powered by a 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine with a bore and stroke of 76 x 55.1mm.

Honda says the CBR’s low-end torque and power are improved, along with a significant increase in top end power. The new ‘Blade makes a claimed 189hp at 12,500rpm - an 11hp increase over the outgoing model.

The engine revs harder and higher than before (up to 13,000rpm), and uses a higher compression ratio (up from 12.3:1 to 13:1) along with revised valve lift and cam timing.

According to Honda, the pistons have an optimised wall thickness and a new crown design, and the surface finishing of the piston ring grooves has been modified to improve performance and efficiency.

Throttle bore has increased by 2mm to 48mm, with the intake funnels shaped to provide a linear throttle response.

The engine weighs a claimed 2kg less than the previous motor, thanks to use of magnesium covers and ‘detail redesign’ – shorter bolts, water hose and water hose bands.

The radiator is 30mm narrower, 30cc smaller and a claimed 100g lighter, and Honda says it provides identical heat dissipation to the previous rad.

The exhaust silencer is made from titanium, as is the 16 litre fuel tank. Both are intended to cut weight and aid mass centralisation.

The slipper clutch has been redesigned to offer less load and more feel at the lever.

Electronics

The 2017 Honda CBR100RR Fireblade SP1’s comprehensive suite of electronics is based around a five-axis Bosch inertial measurement unit (IMU) .

The IMU knows wheel and engine speeds, brake input and throttle position and works with the traction control (called HSTC – Honda Selectable Torque System) and cornering ABS systems to allow optimum acceleration out of corners, plus hard trail braking (which it does by monitoring deceleration and lean angle to vary the threshold for ABS decompression).

The HSTC system is, Honda says, an advanced version of what’s on the RC213V-S. It senses differences in wheel speed, plus the bike’s roll angle, roll and yaw directions and acceleration across three planes to maintain traction and drive. The HSTC has nine levels of intervention and can be turned off.

There’s also a system called SEB (Selectable Engine Braking) to alter the amount of engine braking on offer.

The new CBR1000RR also has active Ohlins front and rear suspension, controlled by a Suspension Control Unit (SCU), which adjusts compression and rebound damping.

There’s a quickshifter and Dowshift Assist for clutchless up and downshifts. Both systems work by injection cut and retard, with three different settings.

The new ‘Blade also boasts wheelie control and rear wheel lift control, which is designed to allow for hard braking while maintaining the rear wheel’s contact with the ground. Whether that means no backing it in at all remains to be seen.

As part of the Fireblade’s RMSS (Ride Mode Select System), there are two sets of three riding modes – three active modes (Track, Sport and Comfort) and three manual modes which allow the rider to set the bike up to his or her preference. Adjustments can be made to the active modes as well.

Complimenting the riding modes is the Power Selector, which offers three levels of power output and is accessed through the RMSS system.

Chassis, suspension and brakes

We saw in recent spy photos that the new Fireblade looks very similar to the previous model and appears to have the same frame, although now we know that it’s not gone unchanged.

Honda says its adjusted the frame’s rigidity balance, so it’s now 10% more flexible in the torsional plane – a change designed to make the chassis feel more reactive. It’s also got thinner walls to save a claimed 500g. Honda also says the aluminium subframe is also 800g lighter.

The swingarm is claimed to be stiffer and lighter thanks to adjustments made to its thickness at various points.

At 1,404mm, the 2017 Fireblade’s wheelbase has been shortened by 6mm the seat height has increased by 11mm to 831mm.

The bike has gained an electronic steering damper.

Stopping power at the front wheel is taken care of by a set of four-piston radially mounted Brembo monoblocs with newly developed hight coefficient of friction pads, which Honda says are suited to aggressive riding.

The wheels are new too, with a Y-shape design, that saves approximately 100g. The front wears a 120/70 tyres and the rear is shod with a 190/50 R17.

The CBR1000RR also gains a full colour TFT liquid crystal dash, which adjusts to the ambient light. The dash information displayed on the dash depends on which one of its three modes its in – Street, Circuit or Mechanic.

All the lights are LED, and the twin front headlights have high/low beam on both sides.

Honda says the two best words best used to describe the styling of the new CBR1000RR are 'minimal' and 'dynamic'. Honda says its concentrated on reducing the surface area of the upper and middle fairings, and has shaved 24mm off the width of the upper fairing and 18mm from the side fairing.

Syling-wise, we think it looks evolutionary, not revolutionary but it has been sharpened up and feels like a logical next step in the Fireblade's design. From the side it has echoes of the CBR600RR.

 

Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

The SP2 version of the 2017 Fireblade is a homologation special, which uses the SP as the base. 

At 195kg, it weighs just one kilogram less than the SP, a saving which could be credited to the Marchesini wheels.

Changes over the SP include a revised cylinder head, which uses 31.5mm diameter intake valves (1mm larger than the SP’s) and 25.5mm exhaust valves (an increase of 1.5mm over the SP). Valve angles have also been altered from 11 degrees for intake and exhaust to 10 and 12 degrees respectively.

The compression ratio is unaltered but the valve shapes and combustion chambers have been optimised for efficiency, Honda says. It runs elongated spark plugs and an RC213V MotoGP-derived  water jacket tightly wrapped around the combustion chambers is intended to improve cooling.

The pistons are also altered over the standard SP. Honda says they use an exclusive crown design with heat treatment that strengthens the area around the piston boss, which uses a 2.5mm shorter (and claimed 8g lighter per cylinder) piston pin. The diameter of the valve lifter has also grown 2mm to 28mm.

The SP2 also has programmable launch control, a pit lane limiter, five-level power selector.

Here's a walkaround video of the Fireblade SP2 at Intermot:

 

 

www.visordown.com

INTERMOT 2016: New 2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP gets more power & electronics, sheds weight

So after quite some time, we have finally seen the much awaited mechanical and electronic upgrade on Honda’s litre-class superbike, CBR1000RR (a.k.a Fireblade in some markets). Available in two variants, the new 2017 models are now christened as CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2.

Apart from the visual upgrades, the new 2017 CBR1000RR gets the much required power upgrade. With 189 hp or 191 PS on the tap, it still isn’t close to the Kawasaki Ninja’s 210 PS or new 2017 GSX-R1000R’s 202 PS but there is a catch. Apart from the power gain, the folks at Minato, Japan have managed to shed some serious weight, now tipping the scale at 195 kg (down by a massive 15 kg) which gives a motorcycle its best ever power-to-weight. Peak power from the 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine sits at 189bhp at 13,000rpm (a gain of 11 bhp) while the peak torque of 116Nm is delivered at 11,000.

For 2017, the Fireblade SP and SP2 are claimed to have moved into ‘Next Stage Total Control’ with a comprehensive electronic control package, developed with reference to the RC213V-S – the street legal version of Honda’s MotoGP machine. The feature rich electronic list includes multiple power modes, Throttle By Wire, Acceleration Position Sensor, engine braking settings and Honda Selectable Torque Control are available, plus Quickshifter, Downshift Assist, new ABS and a lot more.

In a first for the Fireblade, also available in 2017 will be the Fireblade SP2 – a road legal homologation special motorcycle using the Fireblade SP as a base and will be ready for race use. The SP2 features lightweight Marchesini wheels and redesigned valves, combustion chamber and pistons; a kit will be available to make it ready for circuit use for racing and leisure.

Check out the finest details of the new 2017 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade through the official release below:

Meet the new Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

Model Overview

Three factors are key to the essence of the new Fireblade SP; less weight, more power and electronics to help the rider wherever and however they’re riding.

The new electronic control system provides constant, selectable and fine-tunable rider support. Central to the system is the 5-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which measures exactly what the machine is doing, in every plane. It works the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) that precisely manages rear wheel traction via the FI-ECU and Throttle By Wire (TBW). The new ABS (also managed by the IMU) offers Rear Lift Control (RLC) and the ability for hard, safe trail braking into corners. Any difference measured between the front and rear wheel speeds engages Wheelie Control, depending on settings.

It also works with the Ohlins Objective Based Tuning Interface to adjust both the compression and rebound damping force of the semi-active Öhlins Electronic Control (S-EC) front fork and rear shock. For the rider this means access to a whole new level of handling ability, with suspension reaction – whether working through pre-sets or manual input – that delivers exactly the right amount of control in every situation. It functions as well on the road as it does the track, and for Honda a new era begins.

At the same time as the S-EC is working the suspension, the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) is precisely managing rear wheel traction through the IMU, FI-ECU and Throttle By Wire (TBW). It also delivers a Wheelie Control function.

Three standard display modes – Street, Circuit and Mechanic – provide all the information required for the rider relevant to the type of riding. The information displayed can be fine-tuned and adjusted while riding by using the left hand switch gear and TFT liquid crystal display, just as on the RC213V-S, Honda’s road going version of its RC213V MotoGP machine.

While the electronic control is very much a new departure for the Fireblade, the combination of the other two factors draws faithfully on the philosophy of the original 1992 machine: the optimal balance of power and weight. The engine revs harder and higher, with a much higher compression ratio and revised cam timing, and uses the TBW (a first for an inline four-cylinder Honda) and Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) which have been inspired by the technology developed for the RC213V-S

Bottom end torque and power are improved, with a significant increase in top-end power – up 8kW to 141kW @13,000rpm and 3 modes of engine output character can be chosen from. A Quickshifter is fitted as standard, as is Downshift Assist (with autoblipper) and new assist slipper clutch.

Thanks to the use of magnesium and careful assessment and lightening of individual parts the engine also carries 2kg less. The new titanium exhaust muffler saves further weight and aids mass centralisation, as does the titanium petrol tank. Overall the Fireblade SP is 15kg lighter than the outgoing model, with a wet weight of 195kg.

The twin-spar aluminium frame’s rigidity balance has been finely adjusted, and the swingarm is stiffer to match. A new rear subframe is lighter as are the redesigned wheels, while Brembo monobloc four-piston front brake calipers use high-performance track-ready brake pads.

The Fireblade SP ’s bodywork outlines an aggressive, functional minimalism, and the machine is slimmer and much more compact with a single seat unit fitted as standard. All lighting is LED and the stunning Tri-Colour paintwork – on a red base – harks back to Honda racing history.

Chassis/Electronics

The Fireblade SP is the first Honda motorcycle to be equipped with Öhlins S-EC suspension front and rear: a 43mm NIX30 fork and TTX36 shock.

The Suspension Control Unit (SCU) receives roll rate, yaw rate and lean angle information from a 40g 5-axis (3-axis acceleration and 2-axis angular velocity) Bosch MM5.10 IMU gyro located close to the machine’s centre of gravity. It also gathers wheel speed, engine rpm, brake input and throttle angle from the FI-ECU and, depending on the suspension mode selected by the rider delivers optimal compression and damping force (adjusted via each step motor) during normal riding, plus hard acceleration, braking and cornering.

There are three Active modes and three Manual modes for the rider to choose from. When set in Active, damping force is controlled and optimised to suit the riding conditions: A1 (’Fast’), A2 (‘Enjoy’) and A3 (‘Safety’). Within the Active Modes the rider can make finer adjustments. The Manual M1, M2 and M3 Modes allow any required adjustments to be made.

Within the electronic control system are a multitude of active features that many riders will find useful. The new ABS allows extremely hard braking while maintaining rear wheel contact with the ground, stopping the tendency for the rear of the machine to elevate or ‘back in’ around the front. It uses the 2-axis acceleration information from the IMU and calculates the acceleration of the machine’s centre of gravity in the lift direction and acceleration perpendicular to that, using the front wheel as a grounding point.

ABS delivers smooth, effective braking into a corner. With information from the IMU, plus front and rear wheel speed sensors, the ABS Modulator controls braking force according to lean angle, even when panic braking. But it also allows for hard trail braking by using two parameters (deceleration derived from wheel speed and front/rear slip rates) plus lean angle to vary the threshold for ABS decompression. ABS delivers an extra sense of security when braking hard on the road, and offers a performance edge in certain conditions on the racetrack.

In isolation all the functions of the EBC – plus the HSTC’s wheelie control – perform specific, individual tasks. When tied together, however and working seamlessly as one they provide technological rider support that elevates the super sports experience, without turning the rider into the passenger. Next Stage Total Control, indeed.

Like the RC213V-S, the Fireblade SP uses a full-colour TFT liquid crystal dash that clearly communicates information to the rider. It automatically adjust to ambient light, with a backlight of up to 1000 cd/m2 luminescence and features 3 modes; Street, Circuit and Mechanic, each displaying information most relevant for usage.

Streetdisplays riding modes (1-3 and USER 1-2) plus the settings for each parameter P (Power), T (HSTC), EB (Selectable Engine Brake) and S (Suspension). Circuit adds in addition to Street mode the lap time, number of laps and difference from the best lap. Mechanic displays the digital tacho, gear position, grip angle, coolant temperature and battery voltage.

Riding mode 1 (FAST) gives full power, with linear throttle response, low HSTC and EB intervention and high damping force. Mode 2 (FUN) controls output through first to third gear, with fairly moderate power increase, medium HSTC, strong EB and medium damping force. Mode 3 (SAFE) controls output through first to fourth gear, with moderate power increase, high HSTC, strong EB and low damping force.

In the 2 USER modes all parameters can be combined and adjusted freely; riding modes, HSTC and suspension settings can be changed while riding from the up/down switch on the left switchgear.

The Shift-Up indicator is a horizontal line of 5 white LEDs located at the top; when engine speeds exceed user presets they go from solid to flashing. Displays include speedometer, tachometer, gear position, quickshifter, coolant temperature, riding distance and twin trip meters.

The onboard computer calculates instantaneous and average fuel economy, trip fuel consumption, average speed and time after last ignition plus remaining fuel after RES light and distance to empty (when selected). This information is shown on the bottom right of the screen. In the upper display, middle right the rider can choose to see the Shift-Up indicator setting speed, grip angle, battery voltage, calendar, or user-defined text.

Switching between modes is controlled by a mode switch on the right of the left hand switchgear. Just above it is an up/down switch that manages and changes the information displayed within the mode.

Chassis

As a machine now a full 15kg lighter – with a wet weight of 195kg – and with 8kW power boost, the Fireblade’s physical handling has also been transformed. Rake and trail remain 23.3°/96mm but the hollow die-cast twin-spar aluminium frame’s rigidity balance has been significantly adjusted to give even sweeter handling with outstanding steering response, feel and stability.

Thinned frame walls save 300g. While transverse rigidity is unchanged, the frame is 10%more flexible in the torsional plane, which works to deliver a faster-reacting chassis. Yaw moment of inertia has been reduced by 15%; roll moment of inertia by10%. The Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD) unobtrusively maintains stability. To complement the frame changes the aluminium Unit Pro-Link swingarm’s hybrid structure has had the thickness of each section adjusted, saving approx. 100g while maintaining transverse rigidity and increasing torsional rigidity.

The die-cast aluminium subframe too has been redesigned and its thinner construction is at the same time highly rigid and 800g lighter – contributing to the concentration of mass and thus neutral handling feel with improved agility. Wheelbase is 1404mm; seat height is 820mm.

Positioned high the weight of the fuel tank (and fuel) plays a significant part in a motorcycle’s handling. In another first for mass production Honda has developed a compact 16L titanium fuel tank for the Fireblade SP. Manufactured by an ultra-deep drawing process, it’s 1.3kg lighter than an equivalent steel design and contributes to the concentration of mass and reduction in the moment of inertia.

Brembo four-piston monobloc radial mount brake calipers use newly developed high-mu (coefficient of friction) brake pads – these have a greater performance parameter at higher temperatures than standard pads, and suit aggressive ridng. The aluminium wheels are a new five Y-shape design, saving approx. 100g. Tyre sizes are 120/70 R17 front and 190/50 R17 rear.

Minimal and dynamic are two words used to best describe the Fireblade SP ’s new styling. The design team wanted to create tightly compact proportions and the upper and middle fairing surfaces have been reduced in size as far as possible. Forward tilting character lines inject an aggressive attitude, with a focus on mechanical functionality, detail and quality of finish.

24mm in width has been squeezed from the upper fairing. Airflow control from the flow surfaces of the fairing, to the surface angle of the headlights and the contouring of their side slits supports stability at speed. In a racing crouch the rider is tucked well out of the airstream. In normal riding situations air pressure is evenly distributed on the rider’s shoulders, back and sides.

18mm has been saved across the middle fairing and its ‘knuckles’ double as RAD intake structures that pass discharged air around the outside, and underneath, the rider’s legs. The knee grip area is 15mm per side slimmer, with the interface between tank cover and the single seat unit athletically accentuated.

All lighting is crisp LED, with the twin front headlights offering high/low beam on both sides. Crowned with a sharply angled new logo, the Fireblade SP will be available in a Tricolour paint option that uses red as its base (rather than white) and pays homage to Honda’s racing tradition and history. Wing-motif patterns underpin the machine’s exclusivity.

A 1kg Lithium-Ion battery saves weight (a lead-acid unit of similar output would weigh 2kg) and provides reliable and consistent electrical charge.

Engine/Electronics

The 17YM Fireblade is the first inline four-cylinder engine from Honda to use Throttle by Wire (TBW) control. Derived and developed from the system used by the RC213V-S, its job is to put precise throttle control – and a very natural feel – in the rider’s right hand.

Heart of the system is a newly developed throttle grip Acceleration Position Sensor (APS) integrated into the right handlebar switchgear, which itself neatly mounts the engine start/stop switch – nothing more. APS converts movement of the grip into an electrical signal sent to the ECU, that then transmits it as an actuator signal to the TBW motor, achieving ideal throttle control relative to grip angle.

The return spring and other mechanisms inside the APS reproduce the initial play and natural feel of a cable, with throttle load set specifically for the Fireblade SP. Working in conjunction with the APS throttle bore is increased 2mm to 48mm (without increasing exterior width) and careful shaping of the intake funnels adds to the linear throttle response.

The Power Selector can be accessed through the Riding Mode Select System (RMSS). It offers 5 levels of output character: Level 1 give peak output in all six gears; Level 2 output is controlled in each gear to achieve smooth throttle feel under acceleration or deceleration; Level 5 has the strongest output control for most moderate throttle response. All levels have the same throttle response on initial opening.

Riding Mode (1) uses Level 1 as its preset, drawing out the full performance of the engine. Mode (2) uses Level 2, and is suitable for twisty roads, while Mode (3) goes to Level 5 for maximum security. Individual rider preferences can also be input manually through the USER 1 and 2 interface.

The Fireblade employs an enhanced version of the Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) used on the RC213V-S. It controls engine torque via two sensing methods – the first uses wheel speed sensors to measure and compare front and rear wheel speeds. When the FI-ECU detects rear wheel acceleration (and front wheel deceleration) it reduces the TBW throttle position, and thus output, keeping the front wheel on the ground. Maximum application of the throttle is thus possible without fear of wheelies, with the support of Wheelie Control.

The second sensing function detects machine roll angle. The IMU located under the seat detects rotational speed in the chassis’ roll and yaw directions, and acceleration in the longitudinal, lateral and vertical directions. It then calculates roll angle to control engine torque, maintaining rear wheel traction at the required level. The body roll calculation logic used by the ECU uses the same attitude detection technologies developed for Honda’s ASIMO humanoid robot, enabling the most precise calculation possible.

Nine intervention levels (plus off) are offered by HSTC to suit rider preferences, and the Riding Modes USER 1 and 2 enable individual changes to be made while moving.

There is also a Selectable Engine Brake (SEB) system to change engine-braking character to match rider preference and a range of conditions. Level 1 offers the highest braking force, Level 3 the lowest. The preset Modes 1, 2 and 3 use recommended settings, but through USER 1 and 2 can be set individually.

A Quickshifter is fitted as standard for clutchless upshifts and works through fuel injection cut and ignition retard. It has 3 settings plus off. Downshift Assist allows clutchless downshifts, and also works via fuel injection cut and ignition retard with TBW autoblipping. It too has 3 settings plus off.

Engine

Honda’s engineers exhaustively re-examined the Fireblade’s 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine to make it as light and powerful as possible. The result of the work is an extra 11bhp, the loss of 2kg and raised rev ceiling of 13,000rpm.

Peak power is 189bhp @ 13,000rpm, with peak torque of 116Nm delivered @ 11,000 10,500rpm. Bore and stroke remain 76 x 55.1mm but compression ratio is up from 12.3:1 to 13:1. This is an engine in a very high state of tune and the crankshaft, valve train and transmission all use higher specification materials than the previous design.

The pistons feature an optimised wall thickness and a new crown design to raise the compression; the surface finishing of the piston-ring grooves has also been modified to improve sealing performance and efficiency. Valve lift and cam timing has been revised to match the higher rpm and greater engine performance.

Power up is just one part of the Fireblade SP ’s story – reduced weight is another. So every part of the engine was scrutinised to see if it could be made lighter. All the engine covers are redesigned (clutch cover is aluminium; the ignition cover magnesium) and the length of the bolts, water hose and water hose bands have been reduced.

With a revised, rounded shape the radiator is 30mm narrower in overall width and 100g lighter (including a 30cc reduction in water capacity). Using a new high-density core it achieves identical heat dissipation and contributes to the slimmer frontal area of the fairing cowls.

The assist slipper clutch is completely revised with a single die-cast pressure plate and clutch centre, and offers reduced load at the lever. For downshifts the slipper functionality remains the same as before but aluminium cam parts (instead of steel) save weight. The gap between the accelerating and decelerating cams has also been optimised, again improving lever feel when changing gear. All of the transmission gears have been pared down to save weight.

The titanium irregular cross-section muffler is 2.8kg lighter and minimises the centre of gravity change; it also creates an unmistakable sound tone from the exhaust on an open throttle. The exhaust supplier to the Repsol Honda MotoGP team was asked to develop the prototype and produced an exquisite design with the 4-2-1 double-skinned downpipes incorporating the exhaust valve within the first main pipe.

4. Technical Specifications

ENGINE
Type Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 16-valve DOHC Inline-4
Engine Displacement (cm³) 999cc
No. of Valves per Cylinder 4
Bore´Stroke (mm) 76 x 55
Compression Ratio 13:01
Max. Power Output 189bhp/13,000rpm
Max. Torque 116Nm/11,000rpm
Oil Capacity 3.4L
FUEL SYSTEM
Carburation PGM-DSFI
Fuel Tank Capacity 16L
Fuel Consumption TBC
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Starter Electric
Battery Capacity 12V-4.5AH(Li-ion)
ACG Output 0.42kw
DRIVETRAIN
Clutch Type Wet, multiplate clutch
Transmission Type 6-speed
Final Drive Chain
FRAME
Type Diamond; aluminium composite twin spar
CHASSIS
Dimensions (LxWxH) 2,065mm x 715mm x 1125mm
Wheelbase 1404mm
Caster Angle 23.3°
Trail 96mm
Seat Height 820mm
Ground Clearance 129mm
Kerb Weight 195kg
Turning radius
SUSPENSION
Type Front Telescopic inverted fork with an inner tube diameter of 43mm, and a NIX30 Smart-EC (OHLINS) Front Fork with preload, compression and rebound adjustments, 120mm stroke
Type Rear Unit Pro-Link with gas-charged TTX36 Smart-EC (Öhlins) damper featuring preload and compression and rebound damping adjustment, 60mm stroke
WHEELS
Rim Size Front 17 inch
Rim Size Rear 17 inch
Tyres Front 120/70ZR17 58W
Tyres Rear 190/50ZR17 73W
BRAKES
ABS System Type 2 Channel
INSTRUMENTS & ELECTRICS
Instruments TFT-LCD
Security System HISS
Headlight LED
Taillight LED

www.motoroids.com

Honda celebrates 25 years of the Fireblade with two track-ready SP versions

In 1992 the CBR900RR Fireblade changed the superbike game, but a quarter century later Honda's production racing icon appears to be lagging behind the competition. The 2017 CBR1000RR SP and SP2 aim to turn the tables both on the road and the race track with a host of upgrades to the existing model.

Logic dictates that a sportbike should be judged by its efficiency in its natural habitat, the race track. In this demanding proving ground the latest generations of Fireblades found it quite difficult to fend off the fierce competition. The World Superbike Championship (WSBK) – the highest racing discipline for production racers – has been dominated by Kawasaki, carrying the torch after Ducati and Aprilia. Actually, the last time Honda challenged successfully the WSBK title was in 2007 with the previous-generation CBR1000RR.

Of course, the aforementioned line of thinking can be seen as a half-truth, since for many people a superbike is just their bike of choice for the road, and the current Fireblade proved to be quite popular as one of the friendliest available.

The 25th anniversary of the Fireblade offered Honda an ideal opportunity to take a step forward. Yet, instead of designing a brand new superbike from the ground up, the Japanese opted to develop the existing model. The new SP retains the same frame and 999 cc engine, but brings vast improvements in every aspect of the motorcycle. In terms of power, aN 11-hp hike brings the tally up to 189 hp and this maximum value is achieved higher in the rev scale at 13,000 rpm. It may still appear to be lagging behind the 200 hp nominal standard of the superbike class, but that's not the whole story.

The power-to-weight ratio is far more influential in any vehicle's performance than absolute horsepower, and Honda has managed to shed a whopping 15 kg (33 lb) off the Fireblade, announcing a kerb weight of 195 kg (430 lb). In order to achieve this, Honda went to great lengths, from re-engineering the frame wall thickness to fitting a titanium fuel tank. Should the numbers prove to be accurate, we could be talking about a potential game-changer here.

The other big news about the Fireblade SP is (inevitably) on the electronic front. This is the first ever CBR to ever employ a throttle-by-wire set-up; an addition backed by a big bag of electronic safety systems.

Led by a 5-axis Bosch MM5.10 Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), the SP's systems include five riding modes, selectable torque control, wheelie control, selectable engine brake, quickshifter with downshift assist, cornering ABS and the same Honda Electronic Steering Damper that was fitted to the previous CBR1000RR.

On top of that, Honda has upped the ante with a set of semi-active electronic suspensions from industry leaders Öhlins. A Suspension Control Unit receives roll, yaw and lean angle input from the IMU, factors in information on wheel speed, engine rpm, brake input and throttle angle from the engine's ECU, and calculates how the 43 mm inverted NIX30 EC forks and the TTX36 EC shock absorber should offer the ideal damping result. The rider can choose from three active preset modes (Fast, Enjoy and Safety), or three manual modes that will allow for any adjustments to the suspension's set-up.

With all these changes to the CBR1000RR, Honda hopes to bring the Fireblade back to superbike racing stardom. Nicky Hayden, Honda's former MotoGP champion (2006) and current WSBK rider, will undoubtedly be very happy with the bike he'll be racing next year. This will not be the Fireblade SP though, but a road-legal homologation special version called SP2.

Based on the SP, this has a couple of more tricks up its sleeve. The most obvious giveaway are the wheels, as the SP2 rolls on a lighter set of Marchesini forged aluminum rims that are said to reduce inertia by 18 percent at the front and 9 percent at the rear. Then there's a gold stripe on the fairing's sides that bear the CBR Fireblade logo.

The most important differences though are found inside the engine, with larger diameter valves, optimized combustion chamber shape and a more effective cooling system that mimics that of the RC213V MotoGP prototype. Although identical on the outside, the inside of the cylinder head incorporates minor changes that allow the fitment of high-lift camshafts. These will be part of two racing kits that will be available specifically for the SP2 – one for general circuit use and another for race.

So now we know which motorcycle Nicky Hayden will be riding next year: the WSBK-prepped version of the CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2. Which coincidentally reminds us that the last time an SP2 was raced by Honda at the world championship, it won. Then it was the V-twin VTR1000 SP2 of Colin Edwards, now it is an in-line four with another American rider on board.

View gallery - 33 images

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Мотоцикл Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP 2014 характеристики, фотографии, обои, отзывы, цена, купить

Основная информацияМодель:Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SPГод:2014Тип:СпортбайкРейтинг:Do you know this bike?Click here to rate it. We miss 2 votes to show the rating.Двигатель и приводРабочий объем:999.80 см3 (61.01 дюймов3)Тип двигателя:In-line four, четырехтактныйМощность:178.36 л.с. (130.2 кВт)) @ 12250 об/минКрутящий момент:114.00 Нм (11.6 kgf-m or 84.1 ft.lbs) @ 10500 об/минКомпрессия:12.3:1Диаметр х Ход поршня:76.0 x 55.1 мм (3.0 x 2.2 дюймов)Клапанов на цилиндр:4Топливная система:Впрыск. PGM-DSFI electronic fuel injectionКонтроль топлива:DOHCЗажигание:Computer-controlled digital transistorised with electronic advanceОхлаждение:ЖидкоеКоробка передач:6-ступенчатаяТип привода:ЦепьСцепление:Wet, multiplate with diaphragm springТрансмиссия:#530 O-ring sealed цепьРасход топлива:5.56 л./100 km (18.0 km/l or 42.31 mpg)Выхлопные газы:129.0 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Выхлопная система:4-2-1Шасси, подвеска, тормоза и колесаТип рамы:Diamond; aluminium composite twin-spar. Swing arm: 596.4.Угол наклона вилки:23.0°Трейл:96 мм (3.8 дюймов)Передний амортизатор:Telescopic inverted fork with an inner tube diameter of 43 mm, and a NIX30(OHLINS) Front Fork with preload, compression and rebound adjustment, 120mm strokeХод переднего амортизатора:109 мм (4.3 дюймов)Задний амортизатор:Unit Pro-Link with gas-charged TTX36(OHLINS) damper featuring 8mm preload and 22 click compression and 22click rebound damping adjustment. 60mm stroke.Ход заднего амортизатора137 мм (5.4 дюймов)Передняя покрышка:120/70-ZR17 Задняя покрышка:190/50-ZR17 Передний тормоз:Двухдисковый. Hydraulic. Four-piston calipers. Диаметр переднего тормоза:320 мм (12.6 дюймов)Задний тормоз:Один диск. Hydraulic. Single-piston caliper. Диаметр заднего тормоза:220 мм (8.7 дюймов)РазмерыВес, включая масло, газ и т.п.:199.0 кг (438.7 фунтов)Высота по седлу:820 мм (32.3 дюймов) If adjustable, lowest setting.Высота:1,135 мм (44.7 дюймов)Длина:2,075 мм (81.7 дюймов)Ширина:720 мм (28.3 дюймов)Клиренс:130 мм (5.1 дюймов)Колесная база:1,410 мм (55.5 дюймов)Вместимость топливного бака:17.50 л. (4.62 галлонов)Резервное топливо:4.00 л. (1.06 галлонов)Прочие характеристикиСтартер:ЭлектрическийЭлектрика:12V/6AH battery.Дополнительная информацияЗапчасти и аксессуары Our partner CMSNL ships low cost OEM motorcycle parts to Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Canada, China, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Montenegro, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, The United States and more. Or check out parts and accessories from our other partners.Задавать вопросыJoin the 14 Honda Fireblade SP discussion group.Страхование, кредиты, тесты Check out insurance here. Search the web for dealers, loan costs, tests, customizing, etc.Похожие моделиList related bikes for comparison of specs

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New 2016 Honda CBR1000RR SP / TT Special Edition = Baddest CBR You can Buy!

– 2016 CBR Fireblade SP + Honda’s “Race Ready Track Pack” = TT Special Edition (McGuinness Isle of Man) Specs Review –

In response to demand from a hard-core Of performance enthusiasts Honda – for the very first time – in 2014 began producing the CBR1000RR Fireblade SP. A track-focused, yet fully street legal, version of the bike that not only looks special – it is special. New for 2016, the CBR1000RR Fireblade ‘TT’ Edition, inspired by John McGuinness’ win at the the Isle of Man TT, comes with a selection of accessories for the track, further improving the look, sound and feel of this special CBR superbike.

You may already be familiar with the SP version of the CBR1000RR but I’ll touch base on a few of the features that come ‘standard’ on the SP that set it apart from your plain-jane 1000RR CBR. The SP chassis wears circuit-ready front and rear Ohlins suspension plus Brembo four-piston mono block calipers, with frame revisions and new top and bottom yokes to suit. Honda’s electronic Combined Anti-lock Brake System comes as standard, with software remapped appropriately. Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP tires are the finishing touch.

“Racing improves the breed” – Soichiro Honda

The 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine gets the same updated cylinder head as the standard 2014 CBR1000RR Fireblade, with improved inlet/exhaust gas flow and combustion efficiency, and the extra 3 HP (2kW) peak horsepower boost. However it features factory-matched pistons and connecting rods, to ensure optimum internal balance. As a track-focused machine there’s no provision for a pillion and a sleek single seat unit saves weight. Further marking the SP version out from standard is its own unique Tri-Color paint – white and two-tone blue, with a central red stripe and trademark Honda gold wheels.

2016 CBR1000RR SP TT Special Edition Walk-Around Video

The CBR1000RR SP uses a new ‘wave’ design ignition key; it offers improved security and its compact size greatly reduces the chance of breakage. Also new is the fuel tank cap – it uses an improved breather design for better venting. Instrumentation is a multi-function LCD with a cockpit display dominated by the digital bar-type linear tachometer that scrolls left to right as engine speed increases. Beneath this are the main numerical readouts: gear position, coolant temperature, speedometer, clock / lap time, trip / fuel efficiency / fuel consumption and odometer / tachometer. At the bottom of the display are lights for headlight high beam, neutral and indicators.

 

Key CBR1000RR SP Fireblade Features
  • Circuit-ready Ohlins suspension front and rear
  • Brembo four-piston mono block front calipers
  • Factory matched pistons and con-rods
  • New ‘wave’ key design for improved security
  • Improved fuel tank cap with better breather design
  • Electronic Combined ABS as standard

Want to know more about the ‘standard’ 2016 CBR1000RR SP and ‘base’ model 2016 CBR1000RR? Here’s a few helpful review links:

 

Now, let’s get to the good stuff… What sets the ‘Guinness’ TT Special Edition CBR1000RR apart from the standard SP version of the CBR1000RR Fireblade that you’re already familiar with? Here’s a breakdown of the aftermarket performance parts Honda decided to throw on this “Race Ready Track Package” as well as some of their own Honda Genuine Accessories…

2016 CBR1000RR SP TT Special Edition

New for 2016, the CBR Fireblade ‘TT’ Edition, inspired by John McGuinness’ win at the the Isle of Man TT, will come fitted with the following accessories:

  • Gilles FX Leavers (with HONDA RACING etching) Black
  • Galfer Front Wave Disks (Pair)
  • Galfer Rear Wave Disk
  • Gilles Moto GP lever Guards (Pair)
  • Akrapovic Slip-On Silencer Kit (Hexagonal) EEC Approved*
  • Gilles VCR Rearset Kit*
  • Tail Tidy*
  • Gilles Optional TCA Paddock Stand Lifters / Crash Pads*
  • Rear Maintenance Stand*

*Race Ready Track Pack

Exhaust & Rearsets

MotoGP style Akrapovič Exhaust. Gilles VCR Rearset Kit. Comes as standard with the race pack.

Levers / Protection

Limited Edition Black Gilles FX Levers with Honda Racing etching and Gilles Moto GP lever guard (clutch and front brake) as standard.

Tail Tidy

Comes as standard with the race pack.

Galfer Wave Brake Rotor

Galfer stainless steel laser cut front wave discs are designed to reduce weight, increase braking power and improve heat dissipation. The lightweight alloy center is hard anodised for a lasting finish.

Lifters & Adjusters

Gilles TCA Chain Adjusters inc Paddock Stand Lifters & Crash pads. Honda genuine rear maintenance stand included with the race pack.

The CBR1000RR SP is and has been since its introduction in 2014, an extremely limited production bike. Honda is keeping this new for 2016 version, the CBR1000RR SP TT, at an even lower production rate so you won’t see many of these floating around. Want to buy the baddest CBR1000RR Fireblade Honda has ever built? Want to buy it in the USA? Sorry… You’re out of luck as Honda is not bringing it to the USA so if you’re lucky enough to be in a country that has this model available, if you’re even remotely considering the idea of purchasing one – I’d hop on it ASAP.

So… Now that you’ve seen, technically, the baddest CBR Honda has ever built for the street. What’s your opinion on these additions to the 2016 CBR1000RR SP Fireblade? I wish they’d give us in the USA a chance at special edition CBR models like this… Sadly, we’ve never had our chance to purchase models like these. The only special edition version we’ve ever been able to get our hands on is the ‘standard’ SP model.

With all of this talk about how bad this 2016 CBR1000RR SP TT McGuinness Special Edition is… Let’s take a flashback in time and remember where it all started with this cool old school picture. This is Mike Hailwood, winning the 1966 world title on the Honda RC166 race bike.

 * Some confuse the name of Fireblade as a different ‘model’ when compared to the 1000cc CBR1000RR. So there’s no confusion, the CBR1000RR and Fireblade are one in the same. Honda uses the model name Fireblade in many countries across the world but does not use the Fireblade name in the USA. Instead, it’s just called CBR1000RR for us on this side of the pond.

www.hondaprokevin.com


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