Honda crf rally 250


2017 Honda CRF250 RALLY Review of Specs | New Dual Sport / Adventure Motorcycle News from EICMA 2016

 

 

– 2017 CRF250 RALLY Buyer’s Guide | Specs: Horsepower & Torque, MPG, Price, Release Date + More! –

Everything you need to know about the 2017 CRF250 RALLY!

The day is here! Honda has finally officially released the 2017 CRF250 RALLY that we have all been eyeballing for over a year now since Honda originally unveiled it as a concept bike. Many of us were hoping for the CRF450 RALLY concept bike to make it into production as well but something is better than nothing. Want to read up on all of my past blog posts covering all of the details on how the CRF250 RALLY made its way to a production bike for 2017? Check out all of my previous 2017 CRF250 RALLY concept blog posts by Clicking Here.

What is the 2017 CRF250 RALLY? It’s based on the updated 2017 CRF250L, the CRF250L RALLY adds a wide range of changes that make it a unique proposition in the market, with styling inspiration from the Team HRC CRF450 RALLY race machine. At the front, the rally-type “floating” screen, fairing and radiator shrouds provide wind protection, with the rest of the machine showing off minimal MX style. The asymmetric headlights are LED, as are the turn signals. A large fuel tank allows extensive range, and the new digital dash includes a fuel gauge and tachometer. Long-travel suspension and high ground clearance enhance its long-distance off-road ability, and a larger floating front disc plus ABS that can be switched off for the rear brake. The engine boasts solid bottom-end torque coupled with substantial top-end power, thanks to updates from the original CRF250L including revised PGM-FI and throttle body, a new airbox and a lightweight exhaust.

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2017 CRF250 RALLY Review Contents:
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1B. Quick Overview of Specs (for those in a hurry)
  • 2. Model Overview
  • 3. Key Features
  • 4. Photo Gallery / Pictures
  • 5. Technical Specifications

1. CRF250 RALLY Introduction

A 250cc dual purpose motorcycle covers many bases: it slips easily through congested city traffic thanks to lightweight and slim proportions matched with superb maneuverability, while its suspension, ground reach and seat height deliver a fun and comfortable ride on rough tarmac and trails. It opens up a whole new range of two-wheeled opportunities, whatever the rider’s experience level.

With styling DNA drawn directly from the HRC CRF450 RALLY Dakar racer, the CRF250 RALLY brings something new to the market. It not only looks ready to compete in a desert stage, but also delivers a real taste of adventure to riders who prefer a light, easy-to-manage machine. Around the world or around the block, the CRF250 RALLY is good to go.

Mr Eiji Sugiyama, Large Project Leader (LPL) 17YM CRF250 RALLY

“The RALLY racer replica segment is an exciting one for us, with the global, human appeal of everything that Team HRC is fighting to achieve in the Dakar RALLY. We really wanted to build on the capabilities of the CRF250L and open up new opportunities for riders young and old. So, with the CRF250 RALLY we set out to make a motorcycle that looks like HRC’s CRF450 RALLY factory machine, is fun to ride both on and off-road for weekend adventures, comfortable to tour with and useful and practical for daily life. It brings the spirit of RALLY-raid racing to every ride.”

1B. Quick Overview of Specs / Features

2017 CRF250 RALLY Engine / Drivetrain
  • Compact and sophisticated liquid-cooled DOHC 249cc single-cylinder four-stroke powerplant produces smooth and consistent torque at low rpm, plus excellent high-rpm performance.
  • A 38mm throttle body (up 2mm from the 2016 CRF250L) combines with a revised airbox, reshaped air boot, new muffler design and a larger-diameter exhaust head pipe to provide improved response and better power in the low and midranges.
  • Programmed Fuel Injection (PGM-FI).
  • Extremely compact roller rocker arm design for the low-friction valve train allows the use of a smaller cylinder head.
  • Gear-driven counterbalancer shaft helps reduce vibrations for rider comfort.
  • Electric start for easy starting.
  • Lightweight aluminum crankcase.
  • Maintenance-free CD ignition.
  • Heavy-duty clutch offers smooth, progressive engagement.
  • Smooth-shifting, versatile six-speed transmission.
  • Heavy-duty O-ring–sealed chain for durability and reduced maintenance.
  • Quiet, USDA-qualified spark arrester/muffler.
  • Maintenance-free sealed battery.
2017 CRF250 RALLY Chassis / Suspension
  • Rally-type “floating” screen, fairing and radiator shrouds provide wind protection, with the rest of the machine showing off minimal MX style.
  • LED asymmetric headlights, as are the turn signals.
  • Large fuel tank allows extensive range.
  • Chassis developed specifically for the CRF250L provides excellent handling and agility.
  • Lightweight semi-double-cradle high-tensile steel frame.
  • Strong 43mm inverted fork provides 11 inches of travel.
  • Pro-Link single-shock rear suspension delivers 10.3 inches of rear-wheel travel.
  • Tapered aluminum swingarm.
  • Powerful wave-design 256mm front disc brake, and 220mm rear disc brake provide strong and consistent stopping power.
  • Meter assembly, taillight and license-plate holder have all been updated for 2017.
  • Large floating front disc—plus ABS that can be switched off for the rear brake—delivers stopping power.
  • Front 21-inch wheel and 18-inch rear wheel with lightweight aluminum rims.
  • New digital dash includes a fuel gauge and tachometer.
  • Durable front and rear steel sprockets.
  • High-quality handlebar with comfortable grips.

2. CRF250 RALLY Model Overview

The CRF250 RALLY uses the CRF250L as its base, and adds a wide range of changes that make it a unique proposition in the market. Styling inspiration draws fully on the HRC CRF450 RALLY race machine. At the front, the ‘floating’ screen, fairing and radiator shrouds provide wind protection, with the rest of the machine showing off minimal MX style. The asymmetric headlights are LED, as are the indicators.

– 2017 CRF250 RALLY Video Review of Specs –

A large fuel tank allows extensive range, and the new digital dash includes a fuel gauge and tachometer. Long travel suspension and high ground clearance enhance its long-distance off-road ability and a larger floating front disc – plus ABS that can be switched off for the rear brake – delivers the stopping power. The EURO4-compliant engine boasts solid bottom-end torque coupled with substantial top end power thanks to changes compared to the original CRF250L, which include revised PGM-FI and throttle body, a new air box connecter tube and lightweight exhaust.

  • 2017 CRF250 RALLY Colors: Red / White / Black
  • 2017 CRF250 RALLY Price: $5,899
  • 2017 CRF250 RALLY Release Date: March 2017

3. CRF250 RALLY Key Features

3.1 Styling & Equipment

The CRF250 RALLY is designed to cover distance and its styling reflects this. Derived from the parts used by the CRF450 RALLY, the ‘floating’ screen, upper/lower fairing and side shrouds effectively shield the rider to offer excellent defense against the elements. Hand guards offer further protection, both for the hands and the brake and clutch levers.

From the machine’s mid-section back, the style is MX-sharp, with side panels and a seat/tank interface that help the rider move freely. A skid plate protects the machine’s underside and the gear lever features a folding tip. Seat height is 895mm, 20mm taller than the CRF250L.

The headlight is a compact, asymmetric dual LED unit while the rear light, LED indicators and number plate bracket tuck discreetly away. Cohesively laid-out, the digital dash features a speedometer, tachometer plus fuel gauge and clock.

The CRF250 RALLY has a 2.66 gallon (10.1L) (including 0.42 gallon / 1.6L reserve) fuel tank that delivers a range of over 198 miles (320 km) thanks to fuel consumption of 78 MPG (33.3km/l WMTC mode). The flat filler cap is hinged for convenience.

The CRF250 RALLY comes finished in Honda’s Extreme Red racing color as a base, with black and white accents inspired by the HRC factory machines.

3.2 Chassis

The CRF250 RALLY’s frame is constructed from steel, with twin oval-section main spars and a semi-double cradle. A wheelbase of 57.3 inches is matched to a 28.1° rake with 4.5 in. (114mm) trail and ground clearance of 10.6 in. (15mm more than the CRF250L). Curb weight for the CRF250 Rally comes in at 341.7 lbs and 346.1 lbs for the ABS model.

A new 43mm Showa inverted fork shares the same 250mm stroke as its sibling, but with 50mm extra overall length. Light weight and rigid, one side houses the spring while the other provides damping control. Both spring rate and damping have been optimised to suit the CRF250 RALLY’s adventurous long-distance aspirations. A 17mm front wheel spindle (2mm larger in diameter) improves strength and handling feel.

Pro-Link rear suspension features a 265mm axle stroke, 25mm more than the CRF250L plus a leverage ratio revised for ride comfort. The Showa shock absorber is a single tube design with 40mm diameter cylinder.

The tapered aluminum swingarm incorporates a monoblock casting that provides the correct rigidity balance and reduces un-sprung mass. Extruded aluminum is used for the chain adjustment collar.

For extra braking power a 296mm floating wave-style disc is worked by a two-piston caliper. Two-channel ABS is fitted as standard and gives the rider the option to switch it off for the rear caliper.

Stylish black aluminum rims (21-inch front/18 rear) mark the CRF250 RALLY out and wear block pattern enduro-style tires (front: 3.00-21 51P, rear: 120/80-18M/C 62P).

3.2 Engine

The CRF250 RALLY’s 250cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder DOHC engine’s performance is focused on bottom-end torque and high rpm power, plus a linear delivery. Peak power of 24 HP (18.2kW) is delivered @ 8,500rpm with peak torque of 16.7 ft/lb TQ (22.6Nm) arriving @ 6,750rpm.

The PGM-FI feeds the fuel/air mixture through a 38mm throttle body and draws air from the airbox via a direct connecting tube. The exhaust muffler has a diameter of 115mm, houses the catalyzer and uses two chambers. A large-bore downpipe helps the engine breathe and make more power.

The engine uses a compact roller/rocker arm valve train and cylinder head, with bore and stroke of 76x55mm. An offset cylinder reduces frictional losses while the piston itself incorporates a special surface material, plus a molybdenum coating. The oil pump features an internal relief structure that prevents aeration of relieved oil.

The crank journal employs a half-split, press-fit metal bearing while the crank bearing uses a cast-iron bush, reducing weight, smoothing the engine and strengthening the rigidity of the case housing, minimizing the internal diameter change due to thermal expansion.

A primary balance shaft further reduces vibration and the six-speed gearbox and clutch are manufactured to cope with the extra stress of riding off-road. The 10.7 kW heat-release radiator features a thin guide-ring cooling fan to maintain even temperatures at low speeds.

The CRF250 RALLY engine is EURO4 compliant.

4. CRF250 RALLY Photo Gallery / Pictures

5. CRF250 RALLY Technical Specifications

ENGINE
Type Liquid-cooled, Single, DOHC
Engine Displacement (cm³) 250cc
No. of Valves per Cylinder 4
Bore ´ Stroke (mm) 76.0 x 55.0
Compression Ratio 10.7:1
Max. Power Output 24 HP (18.2kW) @ 8500rpm
Max. Torque 16.7 ft/lb TQ (22.6Nm) @ 6750rpm
Oil Capacity 1.8L
FUEL SYSTEM
Carburation PGM-FI
Fuel Tank Capacity 2.66 gallons (10.1L)
Fuel Consumption 78 MPG (33.3L/100km)
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Starter Electric
Battery Capacity 12V-7AH
ACG Output 324W / 5000rpm
DRIVETRAIN
Clutch Type Wet multiplate hydraulic
Transmission Type 6-speed
Final Drive Chain
FRAME
Type Steel Twin Tube
CHASSIS
Dimensions (LxWxH) 2210 x 900 x 1425mm
Wheelbase 57.3 in. (1455mm)
Caster Angle 28.1°
Trail 114mm
Seat Height 35.2 in. (895mm)
Ground Clearance 10.6 in. (270mm)
Curb Weight 341.7 lbs (157kg)
Turning radius 2.3m
SUSPENSION
Type Front 43mm Telescopic Upsidedown
Type Rear Prolink
WHEELS
Rim Size Front 21 inch
Rim Size Rear 18 inch
Tires Front 3.00-21 51P
Tires Rear 120/80-18M/C 62P
BRAKES
ABS System Type 2 channel
INSTRUMENTS & ELECTRICS
Instruments Digital
Headlight LED
Taillight Bulb

All specifications are provisional and subject to change without notice.

 

www.hondaprokevin.com

2017 Honda CRF250L Rally Preview

A quarter-liter ADV from Big Red

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Hot on the heels of its popular new Africa Twin model introduced last year comes a lighter-weight adventure-focused motorcycle from Honda, the CRF250L Rally. The Rally is based on the updated-for-2017 CRF250L and inspired by the factory CRF450 Rally machine raced in the Dakar by Team HRC.

Up front, the rally-type “floating” screen, fairing and radiator shrouds provide wind protection, while the asymmetric headlights and turn signals are of the LED variety. The Rally features a digital dash including a fuel gauge and tachometer, long-travel suspension, and a single large floating front disc with switchable ABS. A 2.7 gallon fuel tank is claimed, offering an extra 0.6 gallons above the regular CRF250L’s tank.

A bump in power is promised via a larger throttle body, revised airbox and a wider exhaust header, with Big Red claiming ”solid bottom-end torque coupled with substantial top-end power.”

“We’re pleased to announce this exciting new CRF250L Rally for 2017,” said Lee Edmunds, Manager of Motorcycle Marketing Communications at American Honda. “Adventure touring continues to grow in popularity, and our customers have shown that small-displacement motorcycles can be extremely effective in this application, whether that means making epic journeys or the daily urban commute. We really wanted to build on the capabilities of the CRF250L and open up new opportunities for riders both young and old, and the CRF250 Rally brings the spirit of rally-raid racing to every ride.”

The CRF250L Rally will come in Red/Black/White for $5,899, and will be available in March of next year. Full specifications are below.

2017 Honda CRF250L Updates

Along with the 250L Rally is a revised CRF250L for the 2017 model year. It includes the engine mods given to the Rally, plus new graphics, ECU and instruments. It will retail for $5,099 when it hits dealers next March.

Follow the rest of our 2016 EICMA show coverage

2017 Honda CRF250L Rally 2017 Honda CRF250L
Engine Type Liquid-cooled, Single, DOHC Liquid-cooled, Single, DOHC
Engine Displacement 250cc 250cc
No. of Valves per Cylinder 4 4
Bore x Stroke (mm) 76.0 x 55.0 76.0 x 55.0
Compression Ratio 10.7:1 10.7:1
Max. Power Output 24.4 hp at 8500 rpm 24.4 hp at 8500 rpm
Max. Torque 16.7 lb-ft at 6750 rpm 16.7 lb-ft at 6750 rpm
Oil Capacity 0.5 gallons 0.5 gallons
Carburation PGM-FI PGM-FI
Fuel Tank Capacity 2.7 gallons 2.0 gallons
Fuel Consumption 78.3 mpg 78.3 mpg
Starter Electric Electric
Battery Capacity 12V-7AH 12V-7AH
ACG Output 324W / 5000rpm 324W / 5000rpm
Clutch Type Wet multiplate hydraulic Wet multiplate hydraulic
Transmission Type 6-speed 6-speed
Final Drive Chain Chain
Chassis Type Steel Twin Tube Steel Twin Tube
Dimensions (LxWxH) 87.0 in. x 35.4 in. x 56.1 in. 86.4 in. x 32.1 in. x 47.0 in.
Wheelbase 57.3 in. 56.9 in.
Caster Angle 28.1° 27.6°
Trail 4.5 in. 4.4 in.
Seat Height 35.2 in. 34.4 in.
Ground Clearance 10.6 in. 10.0 in.
Kerb Weight 346 pounds (claimed) 322 pounds (claimed)
Turning radius 7.5 ft. 7.5 ft.
Front Suspension 43mm telescopic uUpside-down fork 43mm telescopic upside-down fork
Rear Suspension Prolink Prolink
Front Wheel 21 inch 21 inch
Rear Wheel 18 inch 18 inch
Tyres Front 3.00-21 51P 3.00-21 51P
Tyres Rear 120/80-18M/C 62P 120/80-18M/C 62P
ABS System Type 2 channel
Instruments Digital Digital
Headlight LED Bulb
Taillight Bulb Bulb

www.motorcycle.com

CRF250 Rally - New Honda Adventure Bike Concept

Honda announced a new 250cc Adventure Bike concept to be revealed at the 2015 Osaka Motorcycle Show.

The competition in the small Adventure Bike segment heats up as news arrived today of a new 250cc Honda Adventure Bike concept to be unveiled at the Osaka Motorcycle Show this weekend. The CRF250 Rally concept bike looks just like a miniature version of the CRF450 Rally bike raced in the Dakar Rally by Joan Barreda, Paolo Goncalves and Laia Sanz. However, this is no rally race bike. The CRF250 Rally is designed for street-legal use with mirrors, license plate holder and turn signals, and is based on the existing CRF250L platform. Changes in bodywork, components and rally-inspired graphics set it apart from the current CRF250L.

No specifications have been revealed yet but from the photos we can see several changes to the existing CRF250L platform. The most obvious differences are the new fully-enclosed bodywork and tall clear windscreen with headlight protector. Full wraparound hand guards and sump/exhaust protector give the bike improved durability off-road. A large rally-style instrument panel incorporates a Gathers M GPS navigation unit with integrated handlebar mounted controls. Headlights, turn signals and tail light are all LED type. Other differences include a redesigned fuel tank, dual Mugen exhaust, fat-tube handlebars, billet aluminum hubs and triple clamps, along with a number of trick anodized aluminum and carbon fiber pieces.

The Honda CRF250 Rally is currently just a concept bike at this time. However, with simple changes to the existing CRF250L platform, the CRF250 Rally could easily become a street-legal production model in a short period of time.

The new 250cc Honda Adventure Bike concept includes rally styling and equipment to make it a better long-distance touring bike than the CRF250L it is based on.

As for performance, the current CRF250L platform includes a 250cc fuel-injected single-cylinder 4-stroke engine that provides 23 hp and 73 MPG according to Honda. At 320 pounds (145 kg) wet the CRF250L platform is relatively light compared to most Adventure Bikes on the market. Combined with 8.7 inches of suspension travel in front and 9.4 inches in the rear, the CRF250L offers an off-road-focused platform for a new Honda Adventure Bike. From the looks of the CRF250 Rally, we would expect a moderate weight gain and similar performance to the current CRF250L.

Photos of the CRF250 Rally show a modified tank design that appears to be larger than the CRF250L’s. This would give the bike improved fuel range and the large windscreen would give it better wind protection for the highway. Large brackets on the rear subframe should provide solid mounting points for optional panniers and rear luggage rack.

We are excited to see new Honda Adventure Bike models being developed that are intended for use in the dirt. The CRF250 Rally seems to have all the elements necessary for an affordably-priced adventure bike with impressive off-road capabilities. We would expect a production version of the CRF250 Rally to be a popular choice among new Adventure Riders and those looking for a lighter, more managable Adventure Bike off-road.

If we could ask for one thing in the production model it would be an increase in displacement. The original CRF250L engine was sourced from the CBR250R sport bike and last year the CBR250R was upgraded to a CBR300R, giving it a 17% power increase. Launching this new model with the CBR300R’s powerplant would be an easy way to increase the bike’s carrying capacity and ability to maintain highways speeds, making it all the more desirable.

No official statements have been made but Motorcycle News magazine claims to have insider information stating that the production version of the Honda CRF250 Rally will be released towards the end of this year as a 2017 model.

For a closer look at this new Honda Adventure Bike concept, check out this video walk-thru of the CRF250 Rally.

www.advpulse.com

2017 HONDA CRF250 RALLY

Model updates: The CRF250 RALLY is ready for weekend adventure, long distance tour or the daily commute, with long travel suspension, large-disk ABS brakes, excellent weather protection from the CRF450 RALLY-inspired bodywork and an impressive cruising range. Engine performance combines solid bottom-end torque with substantial top-end power.

Contents:

1 Introduction

2 Model overview

3 Key features

4 Technical specifications

 

1. Introduction

A 250cc dual purpose motorcycle covers many bases: it slips easily through congested city traffic thanks to lightweight and slim proportions matched with superb maneuverability, while its suspension, ground reach and seat height deliver a fun and comfortable ride on rough tarmac and trails. It opens up a whole new range of two-wheeled opportunities, whatever the rider’s experience level.

With styling DNA drawn directly from the HRC CRF450 RALLY Dakar racer, the CRF250 RALLY brings something new to the market. It not only looks ready to compete in a desert stage, but also delivers a real taste of adventure to riders who prefer a light, easy-to-manage machine. Around the world or around the block, the CRF250 RALLY is good to go.

Mr Eiji Sugiyama, Large Project Leader (LPL) 17YM CRF250 RALLY

“The rally racer replica segment is an exciting one for us, with the global, human appeal of everything that Team HRC is fighting to achieve in the Dakar Rally. We really wanted to build on the capabilities of the CRF250L and open up new opportunities for riders young and old. So, with the CRF250 RALLY we set out to make a motorcycle that looks like HRC’s CRF450 RALLY factory machine, is fun to ride both on and off-road for weekend adventures, comfortable to tour with and useful and practical for daily life. It brings the spirit of Rally-raid racing to every ride.”

Honda CRF250 RALLY – Weekend Adventure!

 

2. Model Overview

The CRF250 RALLY uses the CRF250L as its base, and adds a wide range of changes that make it a unique proposition in the market. Styling inspiration draws fully on the HRC CRF450 RALLY race machine. At the front, the ‘floating’ screen, fairing and radiator shrouds provide wind protection, with the rest of the machine showing off minimal MX style. The asymmetric headlights are LED, as are the indicators.

A large fuel tank allows extensive range, and the new digital dash includes a fuel gauge and tachometer. Long travel suspension and high ground clearance enhance its long-distance off-road ability and a larger floating front disc – plus ABS that can be switched off for the rear brake – delivers the stopping power. The EURO4-compliant engine boasts solid bottom-end torque coupled with substantial top end power thanks to changes compared to the original CRF250L, which include revised PGM-FI and throttle body, a new air box connecter tube and lightweight exhaust.

 

3. Key Features

3.1 Styling & Equipment

The CRF250 RALLY is designed to cover distance and its styling reflects this. Derived from the parts used by the CRF450 RALLY, the ‘floating’ screen, upper/lower fairing and side shrouds effectively shield the rider to offer excellent defence against the elements. Hand guards offer further protection, both for the hands and the brake and clutch levers.

From the machine’s mid-section back, the style is MX-sharp, with side panels and a seat/tank interface that help the rider move freely. A skid plate protects the machine’s underside and the gear lever features a folding tip. Seat height is 895mm, 20mm taller than the CRF250L.

The headlight is a compact, asymmetric dual LED unit while the rear light, LED indicators and number plate bracket tuck discreetly away. Cohesively laid-out, the digital dash features a speedometer, tachometer plus fuel gauge and clock.

The 10.1L (including 1.6L reserve) fuel tank delivers a range of over 320km thanks to fuel consumption of 33.3km/l (WMTC mode). The flat filler cap is hinged for convenience.

The CRF250 RALLY comes finished in Honda’s Extreme Red racing colour as a base, with black and white accents inspired by the HRC factory machines.

 

3.2 Chassis

The CRF250 RALLY’s frame is constructed from steel, with twin oval-section main spars and a semi-double cradle. A wheelbase of 1,455mm is matched to a 28.1° rake with 114mm trail and ground clearance of 270mm (15mm more than the CRF250L). Wet weight is 157kg.

A new 43mm Showa inverted fork shares the same 250mm stroke as its sibling, but with 50mm extra overall length. Light weight and rigid, one side houses the spring while the other provides damping control. Both spring rate and damping have been optimised to suit the CRF250 RALLY’s adventurous long-distance aspirations. A 17mm front wheel spindle (2mm larger in diameter) improves strength and handling feel.

Pro-Link rear suspension features a 265mm axle stroke, 25mm more than the CRF250L plus a leverage ratio revised for ride comfort. The Showa shock absorber is a single tube design with 40mm diameter cylinder.

The tapered aluminium swingarm incorporates a monoblock casting that provides the correct rigidity balance and reduces un-sprung mass. Extruded aluminium is used for the chain adjustment collar.

For extra braking power a 296mm floating wave-style disc is worked by a two-piston caliper. Two-channel ABS is fitted as standard and gives the rider the option to switch it off for the rear caliper.

Stylish black Alumite aluminium rims (21-inch front/18 rear) mark the CRF250 RALLY out and wear block pattern enduro-style tyres (front: 3.00-21 51P, rear: 120/80-18M/C 62P).

 

3.2 Engine

The CRF250 RALLY’s 250cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder DOHC engine’s performance is focused on bottom-end torque and high rpm power, plus a linear delivery. Peak power of 18.2kW is delivered @ 8,500rpm with peak torque of 22.6Nm arriving @ 6,750rpm.

The PGM-FI feeds the fuel/air mixture through a 38mm throttle body and draws air from the airbox via a direct connecting tube. The exhaust muffler has a diameter of 115mm, houses the catalyzer and uses two chambers. A large-bore downpipe helps the engine breathe and make more power.

The engine uses a compact roller/rocker arm valve train and cylinder head, with bore and stroke of 76x55mm. An offset cylinder reduces frictional losses while the piston itself incorporates a special surface material, plus a molybdenum coating. The oil pump features an internal relief structure that prevents aeration of relieved oil.

The crank journal employs a half-split, press-fit metal bearing while the crank bearing uses a cast-iron bush, reducing weight, smoothing the engine and strengthening the rigidity of the case housing, minimizing the internal diameter change due to thermal expansion.

A primary balance shaft further reduces vibration and the six-speed gearbox and clutch are manufactured to cope with the extra stress of riding off-road. The 10.7 kW heat-release radiator features a thin guide-ring cooling fan to maintain even temperatures at low speeds.

The CRF250 RALLY engine is EURO4 compliant.

 

4. Technical Specifications

ENGINE

 

Type

Liquid-cooled, Single, DOHC

Engine Displacement (cm³)

250cc

No. of Valves per Cylinder

4

Bore ´ Stroke (mm)

76.0 x 55.0

Compression Ratio

10.7:1

Max. Power Output

18.2kW/8500rpm

Max. Torque

22.6Nm/6750rpm

Oil Capacity

1.8L

FUEL SYSTEM

 

Carburation

PGM-FI

Fuel Tank Capacity

10.1L

Fuel Consumption

33.3L/100km

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

 

Starter

Electric

Battery Capacity

12V-7AH

ACG Output

324W / 5000rpm

DRIVETRAIN

 

Clutch Type

Wet multiplate hydraulic

Transmission Type

6-speed

Final Drive

Chain

FRAME

 

Type

Steel Twin Tube

CHASSIS

 

Dimensions (LxWxH)

2210 x 900 x 1425mm

Wheelbase

1455mm

Caster Angle

28.1°

Trail

114mm

Seat Height

895mm

Ground Clearance

270mm

Kerb Weight

157kg

Turning radius

2.3m

SUSPENSION

 

Type Front

43mm Telescopic Upsidedown

Type Rear

Prolink

WHEELS

 

Rim Size Front

21 inch

Rim Size Rear

18 inch

Tyres Front

3.00-21 51P

Tyres Rear

120/80-18M/C 62P

BRAKES

 

ABS System Type

2 channel

INSTRUMENTS & ELECTRICS

 

Instruments

Digital

Headlight

LED

Taillight

Bulb

 All specifications are provisional and subject to change without notice.

hondanews.eu

Project Honda CRF 250 Rally

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2017 Honda CRF250L and CRF250L Rally First Ride | Review

2017 Honda CRF250LMSRP: $5,149 ($5,449 ABS)

2017 Honda CRF250L RallyMSRP: $5,899 ($6,199 ABS)

We aren’t going to beat around the bush: Since its introduction in 2013, the CRF250L hasn’t lit the dual-sport world on fire. Its mellow-mannered power, soft suspension, and considerable weight for a dual sport bike had us preferring to ride more dirt worthy street-legal bikes when we needed a plate (and you can’t really blame us, we are Dirt Rider after all). But we hadn’t really got the whole picture until yesterday.

The CRF250L’s problem is not so much the bike itself, but one of perspective which is partly Big Red’s fault and partly our own. Honda is to blame for making the bike look too much like the CRF-Rs, because that’s what they did. The bike looks like a full on dirt bike which then leads us to expect full-on dirt bike performance. The part that’s our fault is that we tend to forget the CRF250L’s price (a very budget friendly $5,149) and that its pedigree is from the street, with the engine and even some other parts coming from the CBR250R sport bike.

CRF250L

Keeping those things in mind we can get to the changes Honda made to the CRF250L then move on to what we really want to talk about, the CRF250L Rally, which has the same changes and a few more. The standard CRF-L received a larger throttle body (38mm, up 2mm), reshaped air boot (100mm longer connecting tube), went from a three-stage to a two-stage muffler making it smaller/lighter, larger header diameter (10mm to 38mm), and smaller roller rocker arm design.

As you might guess, Honda wanted to let the little DOHC, four-valve engine to breath a bit more and we would say that they were relatively successful. In all fairness we haven’t had one in our test fleet since the original four years ago but the power output, while still very tame, seemed a little less tame than the ’13 model. The power still has a very street-bike-like linear output that is great for new or mellow riders. However, it lacks excitement and is devoid of any manner of snap or pop required for serious trail riding. A nice feature is that there is now a tach on the dash so you can make sure visually that you aren’t being overly abusive to the motor. Since it came from the street, the engine is actually happy to rev out further than you would expect – this is a saving grace when getting into steep and/or particularly loose terrain.

Suspension and handling are the same as we remember which is to say comfortable, soft, and easy going. There are no clickers to adjust so if you need to make changes you’ll have to take it to your suspension guy. Right off the bat we’d like to see both front and rear much stiffer since we would easily bottom out landing from a small water-bar jump. We can praise the CRF250L’s balance and say that front-to-rear the bike is level and the suspension works in unison to handle small chop, small rocks, and even bigger obstacles when taken at in first gear. The weight of the bike shows up when you want to make quick direction changes at any kind of clip, but when we slowed down and rode at a milder pace the bike didn’t want to push through turns as much. In the semi-technical sections of the intro, the CRF-L actually works well in first gear handling wise because of the generous steering locks, low center of gravity, and the fact that most people can flat-foot at will.

CRF250L Rally

While the standard version still gives us the impression that it is a slightly awkward street bike in off-road attire, the CRF250L Rally gives us an entirely different impression. The Rally feels like the 125 of Adventure bikes. We’ll explain that later, but first the differences between the standard and Rally bike. Most noticeable are the shrouds, bigger tank (2.7 gal. from 2.1), and frame-mounted wind screen/light/dash (meaning it doesn’t turn with the bars). Performance wise, we were happy to see the suspension got some attention with a 30mm longer fork and new link and connecting rod out back. Both give the Rally more travel and ground clearance, but the valving and springs are the same as the standard model.

Back to the 125 of Adventure bike feel. When hopping on the Rally, we got into a totally different mindset mostly because of the looks and the new instrument tower/windscreen. When we started to think about the bike in that perspective, as an ultra-light ADV machine, we started having a blast. It sounds crazy, we know, but when we were riding the Rally version, we started thinking about all of the adventure bikes we’ve ridden and how light this bike feels and how easy it is to turn and how small it is compared to those much larger machines. Then you notice that the windscreen and shrouds actually make the road and highway sections much nicer, the amount of fuel in the tank is less of a worry, and that you’d have no problem picking this machine up if your bravery outweighed your skill. Does the power compare to those 1000cc-plus machines? Not in the least bit, but, and this is a big but, in our experience while riding massive ADV bikes in the dirt we didn’t even come close to using half the power we had on tap and we had to learn a different language to turn off all the computer aided systems that try to make those huge machines controllable in the dirt. You can buy the CRF250L Rally or the standard version with ABS if you want, but we turned it off immediately and if given the choice would have ridden the non-ABS version.

The suspension has the same uber-plush ride that the standard CRF-L has, yet the increased ground clearance and travel was appreciated on some seriously chewed up/rain-rutted dirt roads. In fact, some of the rut crossings might have too steep and abrupt for heavier, bigger adventure bikes. We still bottomed the fork when landing from little trail jumps but it took a little longer to get to the bottom.

To Rally Or Not To Rally

Hands down, we like the Rally better. The wind screen, skidplate, and fairing add comfort and protection without any draw backs in the dirt, bigger tank means longer rides, and more suspension means we can be a little bit more rowdy. We’d say the CRF250L is the way to go if you want to spend even less money, you want to ride local dirt road and two track at a sightseeing pace, and you want a street legal commuter and/or campground bike. The CRF250L Rally is for those of you out there that have, or ever have had, a desire to do some adventure bike riding but was intimidated by the size, investment, or weight of other adventure bikes. You can buy 3.2 of these Rally models for what a BMW 1200 GS Adventure cost. As people that have ridden both, we’d take the Rally almost any day over a full-size ADV machine.

www.dirtrider.com

2017 Honda CRF250L Rally Review

From the song “Little Honda” by the Beach Boys:

I’m gonna wake you up early cause I’m gonna take a ride with you.We’re goin’ down to the Honda shop, I’ll tell you what we’re gonna do.Put on a ragged sweatshirt, I’ll take you anywhere you want me to.First gear, it’s all right (Honda, Honda, go faster, faster)Second gear, I’ll lean right (Honda, Honda, go faster, faster)Third gear, hang on tight (Honda, Honda, go faster, faster)Faster, it’s all right.

There’s no denying that Honda’s CRF250L dual-sport machine is a hit.

The CRF250L’s high-winding engine doesn’t pack a lot of punch, but that hasn’t stopped it from putting a whoopin’ on the competition in the dual-sport market. The entry-level CRF250L has been a true overachiever, leading the category, says Honda, with 20% of the market share. Around 4000 customers ponied up for a CRF250L in 2016, and we haven’t heard of too many complaints from ’em. The CRF250L isn’t the quickest or fastest machine in the quarter-liter class, but it was never designed to be a massive off-roader as much as an off-roader for the masses.

It’s not a big motorcycle,Just a groovy little motorbike.It’s more fun than a barrel of monkeys,That two-wheeled bike.We’ll ride on out of the townTo anyplace I know you like.

Going anyplace has been the strong suit of the CRF250L since its inception, and for 2017 Honda has not only updated the standard CRF250L to give it a little more zest, it has also added a second, eye-catching model: Joining the standard CRF250L this year is the CRF250L Rally, which boasts Dakar Rally styling lifted from Honda’s CRF450 Rally machine, slightly taller suspension and more fuel capacity than the CRF250L so you can have even more fun between filling stations. For 2017, the CRF250L costs $5,149 while the CRF250L Rally retails for $5,899.

Although the CRF250L Rally weighs more than the Honda CRF250L, the extra poundage doesn’t hurt it in the handling department. The Rally is a capable corner carver on asphalt.

Honda recently invited us to sample both machines in Southern California, using the California headquarters of Johnny Campbell Racing as its base station. If you don’t know who Johnny Campbell is, then you must not know off-road racing, because the San Clemente-born Campbell is a legend in the discipline with a plethora of SCORE Baja 500 and 1000 wins as well as two finishes in the Dakar Rally. Now retired from racing, Campbell fields Honda factory-backed teams in the AMSOIL Grand National Cross Country Series, where team rider Trevor Bollinger is the reigning champion in the XC2 Pro class. Our band of journalists got the chance to sample the CRF250L and CRF250L Rally equally while embarking on a self-guided tour using the Rever navigational app on a route that mixed a good portion of off-road riding in with two-lane blacktop as we rode to and from the Robert Renzoni Winery for lunch before swapping models and heading back to JCR in the afternoon.

While the CRF250L Rally is technically an all-new model, it shares the updates made to the CRF250L, which include a 2mm larger throttle body (now 38mm rather than 36mm) and a revised airbox with a 100mm longer connecting tube for improved throttle response. The airboot has also been reshaped to give the CRF250L a better “pulse feeling” when riding. Its two-chamber structure is also more compact and thus a little lighter than the previous component. In search of a little more peak horsepower while reducing emissions, Honda also fitted a new ECU and increased the exhaust headpipe size by 10mm, to 38mm.

The Honda CRF250L retains the same character that made it the best-selling dual-sport model in America, but it (and the Rally) received updates for 2017 to enhance power while meeting emissions standards.

Chassis-wise the CRF250L receives a few more upgrades for 2017, including updated instrumentation that features a bar-graph tachometer to keep track of revs, LED bulbs in the taillight for improved reliability and brighter lighting, an updated license-plate holder, and a new wave-style 256mm front rotor (the CRF250L Rally’s is bigger still, 296mm). Even better, both 2017 CRF250Ls are available with optional two-channel ABS that can be deactivated for dirt riding.

Where the CRF250L boasts new CRF motocross-style graphics, the CRF250L Rally offers an entirely different look. In addition to the engine upgrades, the Rally model’s Showa fork travel is stretched 1.18 inches while its Showa shock rides on a different linkage than the CRF250L. Its Dakar-influenced styling also incorporates a 2.7-gallon fuel cell, 0.6 gallon more than the CRF250L.

Our day began with the CRF250L Rally, and it included some rather technical fire-road terrain with plenty of rocks and huge washouts, courtesy of last winter’s torrential rains. It made for an excellent test of the Rally’s capability.

It may not feel any stronger than the previous model, but the CRF250L still delivers a delightful ride thanks to its responsive, fuel-injected engine and its weight-defying handling character.

It climbs the hills like a Matchless,Cause my Honda’ built really light.When I go into the turnsBetter hang on tight.I’d better turn on the lightsSo we can ride my Honda tonight.

Sorry, uh, Boys, but as we expected, the Rally’s Thailand-built, CBR250R-based 249.6cc four-stroke Single is no power monger even with the larger 38mm throttle body and other performance updates incorporated by Honda, and yet it’s still a delight. Its 76mm bore and 55mm stroke, DOHC four-valve favors rpm over torque, and there’s plenty of breath to keep the Rally rolling down the road or along the trail. The 250L motor is truly electric in feel despite its lack of grunt, and its smooth-shifting six-speed gearbox and linear-feeling cable-operated clutch facilitate the multiple gear changes needed to keep the engine in the meat of its powerband. The CRF250L’s ratios are identical to the CBR’s, but the CRF transmission boasts wider gears and strengthened shift dogs. The clutch is also fitted with a judder spring in its hub to absorb shock loads through the driveline if the rear wheel should snag a rock or a tree root on the trail.

The engine’s smooth and precise fuel-injection is a real plus, delivering clean throttle response, though you still need to rev it up and snap the clutch in order to pop over rocks, ruts and other obstacles on the trail. When the going gets slick, the L motor has just enough flywheel inertia to maintain sure-footed traction through most of the off-road terrain you’re likely to attempt on the Rally. The real beauty of the Honda motor is that it instills confidence to allow a rider to grow his or her off-road capabilities without getting into trouble. Previous CRF250L testing has shown us that the engine’s fuel economy is around 73 mpg, so the CRF250L and the Rally should be as user-friendly at the gas pump as it is on- or off-road.

Both the CRF250L Rally and the CRF250L deliver all-day riding comfort, although we prefer the Rally for its extra wind protection.

Neither the CRF250L Rally nor the CRF250L are lightweights. Honda claims curb weights of 341.7 lbs. for the CRF250L Rally and 317.5 lbs. for the CRF250L in non-ABS trim, but weight isn’t really a shortcoming when you’re knocking about on either machine. The shared chassis features a combination of twin oval-section main spars, a semi-double cradle bottom connected to a round steel, bolt-on subframe. Thanks to its greater fork travel, the CRF250L Rally’s wheelbase measures 57.3 inches, with the front-end geometry checking-in at 28.1° of rake and 4.5 inches of trail while the CRF250L rides on a 56.9-inch wheelbase with a 27.6° rake and 4.4 inches of trail.

Both machines deliver reasonably precise steering thanks to wide handlebars that afford the rider plenty of leverage when transitioning from left to right and back again. The chassis on both machines delivers a stable feel, allowing you to push either machine harder than you’d think you could. Experienced off-roaders might be wanting more performance in a few key areas, but not so much that the CRF250L or the Rally are a big letdown to ride in stock trim.

Although the CRF250L Rally boasts about 1.2 inches more travel than the CRF250L, its extra weight and soft suspension settings require that you pick your flights carefully. The CRF250L delivers a tauter ride that is more conducive to off-road tomfoolery.

If there’s one area where the CRF250L Rally does come up a little short – and that’s ironic – it’s in the suspension department. Despite its 1.18-inch longer, 11.3-inch travel, 43mm coil spring Showa inverted fork up front, the added weight of the Rally’s bodywork and heavier fuel load tend to make the front suspension action feel mushy when reasonable hits are encountered. While the shock is mounted to a Honda Pro-Link rear suspension system with a tapered aluminum swingarm to yield 10.6 inches of rear suspension travel, both ends are on the cushy side once the pace goes beyond casual trail-riding speeds.

That isn’t the case on the lighter CRF250L, which features essentially the same fork and shock but with 9.8 inches and 9.4 inches of travel respectively. The standard model doesn’t reach its off-road speed limit quite as quickly as the Rally. We found out during our return leg to Johnny Campbell Racing that it is surprising just how silly you can get on the CRF250L before common sense prevails and keeps you from going on your head. The sensation is that the CRF250L’s suspenders simply have more spring tension, which delivers a tauter and more controlled feel that helps when you find yourself going a little too quickly in the rough stuff, and the CRF250L’s smaller and slimmer overall feel encourages such shenanigans in the first place.

But if you should find yourself needing to get on the binders, at least Honda didn’t scrimp on their performance. The 296mm wave-style front rotor on the CRF250L Rally and the 256mm wave-style rotor on the standard CRF250L, which are both clamped by Nissin twin-piston calipers, deliver a smooth and controllable feel when applied. The action is more akin to dirtbike brakes than streetbike brakes, which is to say more linear than downright powerful, but the front brake on either machine works well with the 220mm rear disc and single-piston caliper out back to provide plenty of stopping power, and with the optional ABS there’s even less reason to worry about locking up either wheel during a panic stop. Adding the ABS option will set the customer back an additional $300 more than the base MSRP on either machine.

The CRF250L and the CRF250L Rally are an absolute blast on two-lane roads, yet despite their gear-driven counterbalancers, the engine buzz at 65 mph can become a nuisance on long freeway jaunts.

But whether you do or don’t opt for ABS, plan on spending a lot of time enjoying either of these machines. If you’re more of a long-distance guy or gal, then the Rally’s larger fuel tank, slightly larger feel and excellent wind protection will be to your liking. If you’re going to spend more time experiencing tight single-track trails, the CRF250L is a better choice for its more dirtbike-like ergonomics for riders who really want to test their mettle on technical trails. Neither machine feels cramped or otherwise uncomfortable in the cockpit.

Either way, know that both machines boast the same top speed – about 81 mph. However, riding them that fast for any length of time isn’t all that pleasant. Despite their smooth-revving performance and vibration-quelling, gear-driven counterbalancers, our experience on the super slabs was that 6000 rpm was about the limit before secondary vibration began to creep through the bars, pegs and seat, making the ride less pleasant. Unfortunately, the bar-graph tachometers on both showed that indicated 65 mph comes at a buzzy 6800 rpm. Keeping the revs to 6000 produces an indicated 58 mph, not really enough for Southern California freeway use but more than enough for two-lane, backroad exploration.

Even so, aside from the few shortcomings that are obvious concessions to their economy-bike status, the 2017 Honda CRF250L and CRF250L Rally are very capable machines for the entry-level or casual dual-sport rider. Both deliver just enough engine performance, comfort, handling and braking to justify their existence, something to which the CRF250L’s sales figures already bear witness. More experienced riders might wish for more power or better suspension performance in the dirt, but that wouldn’t stop us from sticking either one of these little Hondas in our garage.

They’re all right.

Lofting the front wheel on either the CRF250L Rally or its standard sibling requires a liberal doses of revs and a snap of the clutch. It’s still fun no matter which way you do it!

2017 Honda CRF250L
+ Highs
  • Excellent all-around performer at a bargain price
  • Great handling
  • Good suspension despite its economy price
– Sighs
  • Too much buzz at freeway speeds
  • Feels heavy next to a proper dirtbike
  • If it’s making more power, darned if we can feel it
2017 Honda CRF250L Rally
+ Highs
  • A new on/off-road model with awesome Adventure-bike styling
  • Smooth and responsive, if not powerful, engine performance
  • All-day comfy ergonomics
– Sighs
  • Mushy suspension action compared to the CRF250L
  • Not quite enough gearing to run 65 mph buzz-free
  • The CRF250L is already heavy enough
Specifications 2017 Honda CRF250L 2017 Honda CRF250L Rally
Engine Type Liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, DOHC, single-cylinder, four-stroke Liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, DOHC, single-cylinder, four-stroke
Bore x Stroke 76.0mm x 55.0mm 76.0mm x 55.0mm
Compression Ratio 10.7:1 10.7:1
Valve Train DOHC; four valves DOHC; four valves
Fueling PGM-FI; 38mm throttle body PGM-FI; 38mm throttle body
Ignition Full transistorized ignition Full transistorized ignition
Transmission Six-speed Six-speed
Final Drive Chain Chain
Front Suspension 43mm Showa telescopic inverted fork; 9.6 in. travel 43mm Showa telescopic inverted fork; 11.6 in. travel
Rear Suspension Pro-Link, Showa single shock; 9.4 in. travel Pro-Link, Showa single shock; 10.3 in. travel
Front Brake Single 256mm disc w/Nissin twin-piston caliper (ABS optional) Single 296mm disc w/Nissin twin-piston caliper (ABS optional)
Rear Brake Single 220mm disc w/Nissin single-piston caliper (ABS optional) Single 220mm disc w/Nissin single-piston caliper (ABS optional)
Front Tire IRC Trails GP 3.00 x 21-inch IRC Trails GP 3.00 x 21-inch
Rear Tire IRC Trails GP 120/80-18-inch IRC Trails GP 120/80-18-inch
Rake 27.° 28.1°
Trail 113mm (4.4 inches) 114mm (4.5 inches)
Seat Height 34.4 inches 35.2 inches
Ground Clearance 10 inches 10.6 inches
Wheelbase 56.9 inches 57.3 inches
Fuel Capacity 2.1 gal. 2.7 gal.
Claimed Curb Weight 317.5 lbs. 341.7 lbs.
Color Red Black/Red/White
MSRP $5,149 (add $300 for ABS model) $5,899 (add $300 for ABS model)

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