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honda e engine : Wikis (The Full Wiki)

The E-series was a line of inline 4-cylinder automobile engines from Honda. These engines were used in the popular Honda Civic, Accord, and Prelude cars in the 1970s and 1980s. One notable technology was CVCC, introduced with this family, which allowed the company to meet high emissions standards without using a catalytic converter.

The CVCC ED1 was on the Ward's 10 Best Engines of the 20th century list.

EB

The EB series displaced 1.2 L (1170 cc, 71 cu in) and was an SOHC 8-valve design with a 2 barrel carburetor. Output for the EB1 was 50 bhp (37 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 59 ft·lbf (80 N·m) @ 3000 rpm, and this was up to 63 bhp (47 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 77 ft·lbf (104 N·m) @ 3000 rpm for the EB2 and EB3.

EC

The EC series engine is used in the gasoline/electric Honda Insight Hybrid. This 3 cylinder Engine is a SOHC 12 valve sized 1 L (995 cc, 61 cu in)-DK. The ECA1 produces 68 hp (50 kW) @ 5700 rpm and 67 ft·lbf (N·m) of torque @ 4800. The ECA1 motor is assisted in various circumstances by a 10 kW permanent magnet DC electric motor adding 8 horsepower (6.0 kW) and Template:Convert/ft.lbf torque throughout the entire RPM range. It is completely unrelated to the rest of the E-series engines.

ED

The ED series introduced the CVCC technology. This group displaced 1.5 L (1487 cc, 91 cu in) and used an SOHC 8-valve design. Output with a 3 barrel carburetor was 52 hp (39 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 68 ft·lbf (92 N·m) @ 3000 rpm.

EF

The EF displaced 1.6 L (1598 cc) and was an SOHC 12-valve (CVCC) engine with a 3 barrel carburetor. Output was 68 hp (51 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 85 ft·lbf (115 N·m) @ 3000 rpm.

EF 2-port

EG

The EG displaced 1.6 L (1598 cc, 98 cu in) and was an SOHC 8-valve engine with a 2 barrel carburetor. Output was 68 hp (51 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 85 ft·lbf (115 N·m) @ 3000 rpm.

EG

1976-1978 Honda Accord Non USDM

EJ

The EJ displaced 1.3 L (1335 cc, 81 cu in) and was an SOHC 12-valve CVCC engine with a 3 barrel carburetor. 4 intake valves, 4 exhaust valves, and 4 auxiliary valves. Output was 68 hp (51 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 77 ft·lbf (104 N·m) @ 3000 rpm.

EK

There were 2 different EK engines, until late 1979 the heads used a two port exhaust design. On the 1979 through 1981 EK1 the head used a four port exhaust design. For 1982 and 1983, the intake and exhaust port layout was changed, and head bolt spacing was changed to allow better flow. EK motors used Honda's CVCC design, and were 8 valve motors with 4 additional auxiliary intake valves. Both displaced 1.8 L (1751 cc, 107 cu in). 2-port output was 72 hp (54 kW) @ 4500 rpm and 94 ft·lbf (127 N·m) @ 3000 rpm, while the original 4-port head raised this to 75 hp (56 kW) @ 4500 rpm and 96 ft·lbf (130 N·m) @ 3000 rpm. The revised 4-port had another slight horsepower increase.

  • EK1 2-port
  • EK1 4-port
  • EK1 4-port (Revised)

EL

The EL displaced 1.6 L (1602 cc, 98 cu in) and was an SOHC 8-valve engine with a 2 barrel carburetor. Output was 78 hp (55 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 97 ft·lbf (125 N·m) @ 3000 rpm.

EM

The EM displaced 1.5 L (1487 cc, 91 cu in) and was an SOHC 12-valve CVCC engine. Early versions produced 52 hp (39 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 68 ft·lbf (92 Nm) @ 3000 rpm, while later ones upped the output to 63 hp (47 kW) @ 5000 rpm and 77 ft·lbf (104 N·m) @ 3000 rpm. All used a 3 barrel carburetor.

EN

The EN displaced 1.3 L (1335 cc, 81 cu in). 8 valve head fitted on Civics in Canada, and also to the Triumph Acclaim in the UK. All Aluminum engine.

EN1 1980-1983 Wagons and Hatchbacks

EN4 1981-1984 Triumph Acclaim, twin carb, 71 bhp (53 kW)

ER

The 'ER displaced 1,237 cc (75.5 cu in) and is a 8 valve SOHC Naturally Asperated engine (CVCC)

compression ratio: 10.2:1Max Power 56 bhp (42 kW) @ 5500Max Torque Template:Convert/ft.lbf @ 3,500 rpm

bore 66mm (2.60")stroke 90mm (3.54")

carburetted version runs a keihin 2bbl carbuettor (honda city)

this engine also has a turbocharged EFI configuration (honda city turbo 1&2)

ER1-4 Honda City

ES

The ES displaced 1.8 L (1829 cc, 112 cu in). All ES engines were SOHC 12-valve engines. The ES1 used dual sidedraft carburetors to produce 100 hp (75 kW) @ 5500 rpm and 104 ft·lbf (141 N·m) @ 4000 rpm. The ES2 replaced this with a standard 3 barrel carburetor for 86 hp (64 kW) @ 5800 rpm and 99 ft·lbf (134 N·m) @ 3500 rpm. Finally, the ES3 used PGM-FI for 101 hp (75 kW) @ 5800 rpm and 108 ft·lbf (146 N·m) @ 2500 rpm.

ET

The ET displaced 1.8 L (1829 cc, 112 cu in) and was an SOHC 12-valve engine. ET1 had a single, downdraft carb with 4-1 exhaust manifold. The ET2 with dual sidedraft carburetors and 4-2-1 exhaust manifold produced 100 hp (75 kW) @ 5500 rpm and 104 ft·lbf (141 N·m) @ 4000 rpm.

EV

The EV displaced 1.3 L (1342 cc, 82 cu in) and was an SOHC 12-valve design. 3 barrel carburetors produced 60 hp (45 kW) @ 5500 rpm and 73 ft·lbf (99 N·m) @ 3500 rpm.

EW

The final E-family engine was the EW. Displacing 1.5 L (1488 cc, 91 cu in), the EWs were SOHC 12-valve engines. Early 3 barrel EW1s produced between 58 and 76  hp (43 and 57 kW) and 80 to 84 ft·lbf (108 to 114 N·m). The fuel injected EW3 and EW4 produced 91 hp (68 kW) @ 5500 rpm and 93 ft·lbf (126 N·m) @ 4500 rpm. The "EW" name was replaced by the, commonly known, Honda "D series." The EW(1,2,3,4, and 5) received a new name as well as engine stamp placement on the front of the engine like the "modern D series" (aka 1988 and newer) in 1987 as the D15A(1,2,3,4, and 5).

  • EW1
    • 1984-1985 Honda Civic/CRX DX(unlabeled)
    • 1984-1987 Honda Civic
  • EW2
    • 1984-1987 Honda Civic non-CVCC EFI (CDM)
  • EW3
    • 1985- Honda Civic/CRX Si non-CVCC
  • EW4
    • 1985-1987 Honda CRX Si non-CVCC
    • 1986-1987 Honda Civic Si non-CVCC
  • EW5
    • similar to the EW1, Fuel injected CVCC 12Valve 4 Aux valves. A third throttle plate in the throttle body supplied intake air to a 5th injector which powered the CVCC ports, The rated power is different between the Civic and the CR-X the Civic makes 100 PS (99 hp) 5800 rpm 13.2 kg/m (9.7 lb·ft) torque @ 4000 rpm, the CR-X made 110 PS (110 hp) 5800 rpm 13.8 kg/m (10.2 lb·ft) torque @ 4500 rpm. Differences in power are largely down to a more efficient exhaust system on the CR-X it used a factory cast iron 4-2-1 extractor went through a catalytic converter further down the exhaust system and had twin exit tail pipes. The Civic had a short 4-1 design into a catalytic converter and single pipe exit. There was a revised intake manifold for vehicles produced in 1986 and 1987. The EW5 was not available in the North American markets, only Japan It came in the following models 1.5i CR-X, 25i 3DR Civic, Ballade CRi 4DR Sedan.

E07Z

A three cylinder engine

See also

www.thefullwiki.org

Honda C engine - Wikipedia

Honda's first production V6 was the C series; it was produced in displacements from 2.0 to 3.5 liters. The C engine was produced in various forms for over 20 years (1985–2005), having first been used in its then new Legend model, and its British sister car the Rover 800-series (and Sterling).

All C engines share in common a 90-degree V from bank to bank. Beyond this fact there is little to no similarity between the three drive train layouts. The engine family can be broken down into three sub families:

  • C20A, C20AT, C25A and C27A (transversely mounted)
  • C30A and C32B (transversely mounted rear)
  • C32A, C35A, and C35B (one-off) (longitudinally mounted)

As a general rule, interchange of parts will not work between these sub groups.

SOHC 2.0 L (1,996 cc)

  • 145 PS (107 kW; 143 hp) @ 6,500 rpm
  • 17.0 kg⋅m (167 N⋅m; 123 lb⋅ft) @ 5,500 rpm

Japan only:

The variable length intake manifold used six individual small-bore intake runners below 3,500 rpm for each cylinder and added an additional six individual larger bore intake runners at higher RPMs.

The C20AT was a turbocharged version, called the "Wing Turbo", producing 190 bhp (141.7 kW; 192.6 PS).

Japan only:

Honda replaced the variable length intake manifold with a variable geometry turbocharger to the C20A engine used in the Japanese Domestic Market Legend. The turbo with intercooler-equipped engine was the C20AT engine and are extremely rare. Honda pioneered variable-geometry turbo chargers. The "Wing Turbo", as Honda called them, were controlled by an 8-bit processor ECU and they were constantly adjusting. Basically, at low speeds the wings surrounding the turbine wheel inside the compressor housing on the intake side would be nearly closed to speed and direct exhaust pressure precisely on the turbine wheel. At 2000 rpm, the wings would fluctuate and it would act like a much larger turbo to increase fuel economy as needed. This car was quick and powerful, but the price premium over the slightly longer and wider Legend with the 2.7 L naturally aspirated V6 was too much for most, so the car disappeared. This was one of the only production Hondas ever turbocharged from the factory (excluding turbo engines of kei car for the Japan domestic market), along with the K23A1 straight-4 engine used in the Acura RDX and the ER straight-4 engine used in the first generation Honda City.

SOHC 24 valves, 9.0:1 compression

Japan

  • 165 PS (121 kW; 163 hp) @ 6,000 rpm
  • 21.5 kg⋅m (211 N⋅m; 156 lb⋅ft) @ 4,500 rpm

North America:

  • 1986-1987 Honda Legend Sedan, 1986-1988 Rover 825 Sedan,
    • 151 bhp (113 kW; 153 PS) @ 5,800 rpm
    • 21.7 kg⋅m (213 N⋅m; 157 lb⋅ft) @ 4,500 rpm
    • UK and Europe (sold in US as Sterling 825i)

The engine utilized a 90 degree V-angle to the crankshaft in preference to the taller but more common 60 degree design, with a compression ratio of 9.0:1. The crankshaft had crankpins offset 30 degrees to provide a low profile engine that fires smoothly and evenly. The block and cross flow pent roof cylinder heads with 24 valves are die-cast from aluminum alloy and the cylinder bores are lined with cast iron. The exhaust system uses equal length exhaust pipes connected to the Exhaust manifold to minimize scavenging resistance and maximum total exhaust efficiency. An external high capacity water cooled oil cooler and filter maintain an efficient oil temperature.

The SOHC C27A is a 2.7 L version, with the major upgrade being the addition of an variable length intake manifold, producing up to 177 bhp(132.0 kW; 179.5 PS)

Applications; non-North America:

  • C27A-2 - 1988-1990 Honda Legend Coupe, 176 bhp (131.2 kW; 178.4 PS) (non catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-2 - 1988-1990 Honda Legend Saloon, 176 bhp (131.2 kW; 178.4 PS) (non catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-2 - 1987-1991 Rover 827/Sterling/Vitesse, 177 bhp (132.0 kW; 179.5 PS) (non catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-1 - 1991 Rover 827/Sterling/Vitesse, 168 bhp (125.3 kW; 170.3 PS) (catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-1 - 1991-1995 Rover 827/Sterling/Coupe, 168 bhp (125.3 kW; 170.3 PS) (catalyst) UK and Europe

Applications; North America:

  • C27A-1 - 1987-1990 Acura Legend Coupe, 161 bhp (120.1 kW; 163.2 PS) (catalyst)
  • C27A-1 - 1988-1990 Acura Legend, 161 bhp (120.1 kW; 163.2 PS) (catalyst)
  • C27A-4 - 1995-1997 Honda Accord, 170 bhp (126.8 kW; 172.4 PS) (catalyst) For this particular vehicle the engine was updated with a more efficient intake manifold.
  • C27A-1 - 1988-1991 Sterling (marque), 168 bhp (125.3 kW; 170.3 PS) (catalyst)

The DOHC VTEC C30A is a 3.0 L version, producing 270 bhp (201.3 kW; 273.7 PS) and 210 lb⋅ft (285 N⋅m) of torque. The engine was the second Honda Engine ever to utilize Honda's proprietary VTEC variable-valve timing system in an automotive application, which adjusts cam lift and duration depending on engine RPM and throttle position. VTEC allows the C30A to produce a high maximum power level while maintaining a relatively flat torque curve. C30A was also equipped with Variable Volume Induction System (VVIS). VVIS used a primary and a secondary intake plenum. Secondary intake plenum engages at 4800 RPM to improve engines breathing ability and broadens torque curve.[1]

The C30A also made use of titanium connecting rods, which was another first in a mass-production vehicle. The lightweight rods allowed a higher RPM to be achieved while maintaining the strength of traditional steel rods. The C30A block is an open-deck design made from an aluminum alloy with cylinders sleeved in ductile iron. The heads are four valve (twenty-four valves per engine total), dual-overhead cam (DOHC) design and contain the VTEC mechanism, which is actuated by oil pressure. For maximum performance, the C30A uses a direct ignition system, with individual coils positioned directly over each cylinder spark plug.

Due to its DOHC layout and its lightweight rotating assembly, the C30A is capable of reliable high RPM operation. Factory redline is 8000 rpm and balanced/blueprinted versions of the engine can easily reach 9000 rpm with little to no reliability issues.

Due to its complexity, cost and use of exotic materials, the C30A was used exclusively on Honda's NSX car. For NSX's equipped with a 4-speed automatic transmission, Honda used a slightly less powerful version of the C30A, which utilized less aggressive cam timing and produced 252 bhp (188 kW; 255 PS).

An advanced version of this engine exists (though not in a production form) that campaigned briefly in the 2004 JGTC racing series (see Super GT) by the factory-supported Team Honda Racing group in highly modified GT-spec NSXs. This engine has various upgrades and modifications by Mugen and is the first turbo-charged Honda engine used in the series (prior to 2003, the GT-spec NSXs used a highly advanced, naturally aspirated variant of the C32B engine). Though the exact performance figures are kept secret, it is rumored to output more than 500 bhp.

Applications:

  • 1991-1996 Honda NSX 5-Speed Manual Transmission
  • 1991-2005 Honda NSX 4-Speed Automatic Transmission

The C32A is a 3.2 L version. The SOHC depending on model year, produces 200 hp (149 kW) and 230 hp (172 kW).

Applications; North America Only:

  • C32A1 - SOHC USDM - 200 hp (149 kW)
  • C32A6 - SOHC USDM - 200 hp (149 kW)
  • C32A1 Performance variation - Also known as the "Type-II" - Uses a higher flowing intake manifold and slightly more aggressive camshaft - SOHC USDM - 230 hp (172 kW) at 206 lb⋅ft (279 N⋅m)

The C32B is a highly tuned DOHC V6 used in the Honda NSX, which produces 290 hp (216 kW) and 224 lb⋅ft (304 N⋅m). The engine is essentially an update to the C30A and does not share commonality with the C32A. Honda increased displacement to 3.2 L (195 cu in) through the use of larger 93 mm (3.7 in) pistons over the 90 mm (3.5 in) used in the C30A. To accommodate the larger pistons, Honda used an advanced metallurgical technique on the cylinders called Fiber Reinforced Metal (FRM), in which an ultra lightweight alumina-carbon fiber is cast into the traditional aluminum alloy for enhanced rigidity. This process allowed thinner cylinder walls to be used while providing acceptable cooling characteristics. The C32B also used 36 mm (1.4 in) intake valves, which are 1 mm (0.04 in) larger than those in the C30A.

Applications:

  • 1997-2005 Honda NSX 6-Speed Manual Transmission

The C35A is a SOHC and carries the largest displacement of the C series at 3.5 L (214 cu in). The c35a was the first mass produced engine to use block forged connecting rods contributing to precise balancing and an exceptionally strong bottom end.[2] The C35 also contains a balance shaft to dampen engine vibrations associated with 90 degree design V6 engines.[2] Besides the addition of these forged components, the overall design is similar to its smaller counterpart the C32A, with some parts being interchangeable. The 9.6:1 compression ratio of the C32A is also retained, despite the increase in displacement.[2]

Applications:

  • C35A - SOHC - 210–225 hp

The C35B (name unconfirmed) is a DOHC V6 with VTEC which shares basic design properties with its SOHC non-VTEC counterpart but with more aggressive camshafts and slightly lighter cylinder walls. This was the only DOHC VTEC V6 ever built by Honda for longitudinal applications and was only used in one non-production car, the Honda FS-X concept.

Applications:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

lookup-api.apple.com

Honda indy v8 - Wikipedia

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Honda c engine - Gpedia, Your Encyclopedia

Honda's first production V6 was the C series; it was produced in displacements from 2.0 to 3.5 liters. The C engine was produced in various forms for over 20 years (1985–2005), having first been used in its then new Legend model, and its British sister car the Rover 800-series (and Sterling).

All C engines share in common a 90-degree V from bank to bank. Beyond this fact there is little to no similarity between the three drive train layouts. The engine family can be broken down into three sub families:

  • C20A, C20AT, C25A and C27A (transversely mounted)
  • C30A and C32B (transversely mounted rear)
  • C32A, C35A, and C35B (one-off) (longitudinally mounted)

As a general rule, interchange of parts will not work between these sub groups.

C20A

SOHC 2.0 L (1,996 cc)

  • 145 PS (107 kW; 143 hp) @ 6,500 rpm
  • 17.0 kg⋅m (167 N⋅m; 123 lb⋅ft) @ 5,500 rpm

Japan only:

The variable length intake manifold used six individual small-bore intake runners below 3,500 rpm for each cylinder and added an additional six individual larger bore intake runners at higher RPMs.

The C20AT was a turbocharged version, called the "Wing Turbo", producing 190 bhp (141.7 kW; 192.6 PS).

Japan only:

Honda replaced the variable length intake manifold with a variable geometry turbocharger to the C20A engine used in the Japanese Domestic Market Legend. The turbo with intercooler-equipped engine was the C20AT engine and are extremely rare. Honda pioneered variable-geometry turbo chargers. The "Wing Turbo", as Honda called them, were controlled by an 8-bit processor ECU and they were constantly adjusting. Basically, at low speeds the wings surrounding the turbine wheel inside the compressor housing on the intake side would be nearly closed to speed and direct exhaust pressure precisely on the turbine wheel. At 2000 rpm, the wings would fluctuate and it would act like a much larger turbo to increase fuel economy as needed. This car was quick and powerful, but the price premium over the slightly longer and wider Legend with the 2.7 L naturally aspirated V6 was too much for most, so the car disappeared. This was one of the only production Hondas ever turbocharged from the factory (excluding turbo engines of kei car for the Japan domestic market), along with the K23A1 straight-4 engine used in the Acura RDX and the ER straight-4 engine used in the first generation Honda City.

C25A

SOHC 24 valves, 9.0:1 compression

Japan

  • 165 PS (121 kW; 163 hp) @ 6,000 rpm
  • 21.5 kg⋅m (211 N⋅m; 156 lb⋅ft) @ 4,500 rpm

North America:

  • 1986-1987 Honda Legend Sedan, 1986-1988 Rover 825 Sedan,
    • 151 bhp (113 kW; 153 PS) @ 5,800 rpm
    • 21.7 kg⋅m (213 N⋅m; 157 lb⋅ft) @ 4,500 rpm
    • UK and Europe (sold in US as Sterling 825i)

The engine utilized a 90 degree V-angle to the crankshaft in preference to the taller but more common 60 degree design, with a compression ratio of 9.0:1. The crankshaft had crankpins offset 30 degrees to provide a low profile engine that fires smoothly and evenly. The block and cross flow pent roof cylinder heads with 24 valves are die-cast from aluminum alloy and the cylinder bores are lined with cast iron. The exhaust system uses equal length exhaust pipes connected to the Exhaust manifold to minimize scavenging resistance and maximum total exhaust efficiency. An external high capacity water cooled oil cooler and filter maintain an efficient oil temperature.

C27A

The SOHC C27A is a 2.7 L version, with the major upgrade being the addition of an variable length intake manifold, producing up to 177 bhp(132.0 kW; 179.5 PS)

Applications; non-North America:

  • C27A-2 - 1988-1990 Honda Legend Coupe, 176 bhp (131.2 kW; 178.4 PS) (non catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-2 - 1988-1990 Honda Legend Saloon, 176 bhp (131.2 kW; 178.4 PS) (non catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-2 - 1987-1991 Rover 827/Sterling/Vitesse, 177 bhp (132.0 kW; 179.5 PS) (non catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-1 - 1991 Rover 827/Sterling/Vitesse, 168 bhp (125.3 kW; 170.3 PS) (catalyst) UK and Europe
  • C27A-1 - 1991-1995 Rover 827/Sterling/Coupe, 168 bhp (125.3 kW; 170.3 PS) (catalyst) UK and Europe

Applications; North America:

  • C27A-1 - 1987-1990 Acura Legend Coupe, 161 bhp (120.1 kW; 163.2 PS) (catalyst)
  • C27A-1 - 1988-1990 Acura Legend, 161 bhp (120.1 kW; 163.2 PS) (catalyst)
  • C27A-4 - 1995-1997 Honda Accord, 170 bhp (126.8 kW; 172.4 PS) (catalyst) For this particular vehicle the engine was updated with a more efficient intake manifold.
  • C27A-1 - 1988-1991 Sterling (marque), 168 bhp (125.3 kW; 170.3 PS) (catalyst)

C30A

The DOHC VTEC C30A is a 3.0 L version, producing 270 bhp (201.3 kW; 273.7 PS) and 210 lb⋅ft (285 N⋅m) of torque. The engine was the second Honda Engine ever to utilize Honda's proprietary VTEC variable-valve timing system in an automotive application, which adjusts cam lift and duration depending on engine RPM and throttle position. VTEC allows the C30A to produce a high maximum power level while maintaining a relatively flat torque curve. C30A was also equipped with Variable Volume Induction System (VVIS). VVIS used a primary and a secondary intake plenum. Secondary intake plenum engages at 4800 RPM to improve engines breathing ability and broadens torque curve.[1]

The C30A also made use of titanium connecting rods, which was another first in a mass-production vehicle. The lightweight rods allowed a higher RPM to be achieved while maintaining the strength of traditional steel rods. The C30A block is an open-deck design made from an aluminum alloy with cylinders sleeved in ductile iron. The heads are four valve (twenty-four valves per engine total), dual-overhead cam (DOHC) design and contain the VTEC mechanism, which is actuated by oil pressure. For maximum performance, the C30A uses a direct ignition system, with individual coils positioned directly over each cylinder spark plug.

Due to its DOHC layout and its lightweight rotating assembly, the C30A is capable of reliable high RPM operation. Factory redline is 8000 rpm and balanced/blueprinted versions of the engine can easily reach 9000 rpm with little to no reliability issues.

Due to its complexity, cost and use of exotic materials, the C30A was used exclusively on Honda's NSX car. For NSX's equipped with a 4-speed automatic transmission, Honda used a slightly less powerful version of the C30A, which utilized less aggressive cam timing and produced 252 bhp (188 kW; 255 PS).

An advanced version of this engine exists (though not in a production form) that campaigned briefly in the 2004 JGTC racing series (see Super GT) by the factory-supported Team Honda Racing group in highly modified GT-spec NSXs. This engine has various upgrades and modifications by Mugen and is the first turbo-charged Honda engine used in the series (prior to 2003, the GT-spec NSXs used a highly advanced, naturally aspirated variant of the C32B engine). Though the exact performance figures are kept secret, it is rumored to output more than 500 bhp.

Applications:

  • 1991-1996 Honda NSX 5-Speed Manual Transmission
  • 1991-2005 Honda NSX 4-Speed Automatic Transmission

C32A

The C32A is a 3.2 L version. The SOHC depending on model year, produces 200 hp (149 kW) and 230 hp (172 kW).

Applications; North America Only:

  • C32A1 - SOHC USDM - 200 hp (149 kW)
  • C32A6 - SOHC USDM - 200 hp (149 kW)
  • C32A1 Performance variation - Also known as the "Type-II" - Uses a higher flowing intake manifold and slightly more aggressive camshaft - SOHC USDM - 230 hp (172 kW) at 206 lb⋅ft (279 N⋅m)

C32B

The C32B is a highly tuned DOHC V6 used in the Honda NSX, which produces 290 hp (216 kW) and 224 lb⋅ft (304 N⋅m). The engine is essentially an update to the C30A and does not share commonality with the C32A. Honda increased displacement to 3.2 L (195 cu in) through the use of larger 93 mm (3.7 in) pistons over the 90 mm (3.5 in) used in the C30A. To accommodate the larger pistons, Honda used an advanced metallurgical technique on the cylinders called Fiber Reinforced Metal (FRM), in which an ultra lightweight alumina-carbon fiber is cast into the traditional aluminum alloy for enhanced rigidity. This process allowed thinner cylinder walls to be used while providing acceptable cooling characteristics. The C32B also used 36 mm (1.4 in) intake valves, which are 1 mm (0.04 in) larger than those in the C30A.

Applications:

  • 1997-2005 Honda NSX 6-Speed Manual Transmission

C35A

The C35A is a SOHC and carries the largest displacement of the C series at 3.5 L (214 cu in). The c35a was the first mass produced engine to use block forged connecting rods contributing to precise balancing and an exceptionally strong bottom end.[2] The C35 also contains a balance shaft to dampen engine vibrations associated with 90 degree design V6 engines.[2] Besides the addition of these forged components, the overall design is similar to its smaller counterpart the C32A, with some parts being interchangeable. The 9.6:1 compression ratio of the C32A is also retained, despite the increase in displacement.[2]

Applications:

  • C35A - SOHC - 210–225 hp

C35B

The C35B (name unconfirmed) is a DOHC V6 with VTEC which shares basic design properties with its SOHC non-VTEC counterpart but with more aggressive camshafts and slightly lighter cylinder walls. This was the only DOHC VTEC V6 ever built by Honda for longitudinal applications and was only used in one non-production car, the Honda FS-X concept.

Applications:

See also

References

www.gpedia.com

Honda C engine - Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

Honda C30A

Honda's first production V6 was the C series; it was produced in displacements from 2.0 to 3.5 liters. The C engine was produced in various forms for over 20 years (1985–2005), having first been used in its then new Legend model, and its British sister car the Rover 800-series (and Sterling).

All C engines share in common a 90-degree V from bank to bank. Beyond this fact there is little to no similarity between the three drive train layouts. The engine family can be broken down into three sub families:

  • C20A, C20AT, C25A and C27A (transversely mounted)
  • C30A and C32B (transversely mounted rear)
  • C32A, C35A, and C35B (one-off) (longitudinally mounted)

As a general rule, interchange of parts will not work between these sub groups.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • Compression Testing Honda Civic 2007 Bad Engine

Contents

C20A

SOHC 2.0 L (1,996 cc)

  • 145 PS (107 kW; 143 hp) @ 6,500 rpm
  • 17.0 kg⋅m (167 N⋅m; 123 lb⋅ft) @ 5,500 rpm

Japan only:

The variable length intake manifold used six individual small-bore intake runners below 3,500 rpm for each cylinder and added an additional six individual larger bore intake runners at higher RPMs.

The C20AT was a turbocharged version, called the "Wing Turbo", producing 190 bhp (141.7 kW; 192.6 PS).

Japan only:

Honda replaced the variable length intake manifold with a variable geometry turbocharger to the C20A engine used in the Japanese Domestic Market Legend. The turbo with intercooler-equipped engine was the C20AT engine and are extremely rare. Honda pioneered variable-geometry turbo chargers. The "Wing Turbo", as Honda called them, were controlled by an 8-bit processor ECU and they were constantly adjusting. Basically, at low speeds the wings surrounding the turbine wheel inside the compressor housing on the intake side would be nearly closed to speed and direct exhaust pressure precisely on the turbine wheel. At 2000 rpm, the wings would fluctuate and it would act like a much larger turbo to increase fuel economy as needed. This car was quick and powerful, but the price premium over the slightly longer and wider Legend with the 2.7 L naturally aspirated V6 was too much for most, so the car disappeared. This was one of the only production Hondas ever turbocharged from the factory (excluding turbo engines of kei car for the Japan domestic market), along with the K23A1 straight-4 engine used in the Acura RDX and the ER straight-4 engine used in the first generation Honda City.

C25A

SOHC 24 valves, 9.0:1 compression

Japan

  • 165 PS (121 kW; 163 hp) @ 6,000 rpm
  • 21.5 kg⋅m (211 N⋅m; 156 lb⋅ft) @ 4,500 rpm

North America:

The engine utilized a 90 degree V-angle to the crankshaft in preference to the taller but more common 60 degree design, with a compression ratio of 9.0:1. The crankshaft had crankpins offset 30 degrees to provide a low profile engine that fires smoothly and evenly. The block and cross flow pent roof cylinder heads with 24 valves are die-cast from aluminum alloy and the cylinder bores are lined with cast iron. The exhaust system uses equal length exhaust pipes connected to the Exhaust manifold to minimize scavenging resistance and maximum total exhaust efficiency. An external high capacity water cooled oil cooler and filter maintain an efficient oil temperature.

C27A

The SOHC C27A is a 2.7 L version, with the major upgrade being the addition of an variable length intake manifold, producing up to 177 bhp(132.0 kW; 179.5 PS)

Applications; non-North America:

Applications; North America:

  • C27A-1 - 1987-1990 Acura Legend Coupe, 161 bhp (120.1 kW; 163.2 PS) (catalyst)
  • C27A-1 - 1988-1990 Acura Legend, 161 bhp (120.1 kW; 163.2 PS) (catalyst)
  • C27A-4 - 1995-1997 Honda Accord, 170 bhp (126.8 kW; 172.4 PS) (catalyst) For this particular vehicle the engine was updated with a more efficient intake manifold.
  • C27A-1 - 1988-1991 Sterling (marque), 168 bhp (125.3 kW; 170.3 PS) (catalyst)

C30A

The DOHC VTEC C30A is a 3.0 L version, producing 270 bhp (201.3 kW; 273.7 PS) and 210 lb⋅ft (285 N⋅m) of torque. The engine was the second Honda Engine ever to utilize Honda's proprietary VTEC variable-valve timing system in an automotive application, which adjusts cam lift and duration depending on engine RPM and throttle position. VTEC allows the C30A to produce a high maximum power level while maintaining a relatively flat torque curve. C30A was also equipped with Variable Volume Induction System (VVIS). VVIS used a primary and a secondary intake plenum. Secondary intake plenum engages at 4800 RPM to improve engines breathing ability and broadens torque curve.[1]

The C30A also made use of titanium connecting rods, which was another first in a mass-production vehicle. The lightweight rods allowed a higher RPM to be achieved while maintaining the strength of traditional steel rods. The C30A block is an open-deck design made from an aluminum alloy with cylinders sleeved in ductile iron. The heads are four valve (twenty-four valves per engine total), dual-overhead cam (DOHC) design and contain the VTEC mechanism, which is actuated by oil pressure. For maximum performance, the C30A uses a direct ignition system, with individual coils positioned directly over each cylinder spark plug.

Due to its DOHC layout and its lightweight rotating assembly, the C30A is capable of reliable high RPM operation. Factory redline is 8000 rpm and balanced/blueprinted versions of the engine can easily reach 9000 rpm with little to no reliability issues.

Due to its complexity, cost and use of exotic materials, the C30A was used exclusively on Honda's NSX car. For NSX's equipped with a 4-speed automatic transmission, Honda used a slightly less powerful version of the C30A, which utilized less aggressive cam timing and produced 252 bhp (188 kW; 255 PS).

An advanced version of this engine exists (though not in a production form) that campaigned briefly in the 2004 JGTC racing series (see Super GT) by the factory-supported Team Honda Racing group in highly modified GT-spec NSXs. This engine has various upgrades and modifications by Mugen and is the first turbo-charged Honda engine used in the series (prior to 2003, the GT-spec NSXs used a highly advanced, naturally aspirated variant of the C32B engine). Though the exact performance figures are kept secret, it is rumored to output more than 500 bhp.

Applications:

C32A

The C32A is a 3.2 L version. The SOHC depending on model year, produces 200 hp (149 kW) and 230 hp (172 kW).

Applications; North America Only:

  • C32A1 - SOHC USDM - 200 hp (149 kW)
  • C32A6 - SOHC USDM - 200 hp (149 kW)
  • C32A1 Performance variation - Also known as the "Type-II" - Uses a higher flowing intake manifold and slightly more aggressive camshaft - SOHC USDM - 230 hp (172 kW) at 206 lb⋅ft (279 N⋅m)

C32B

The C32B is a highly tuned DOHC V6 used in the Honda NSX, which produces 290 hp (216 kW) and 224 lb⋅ft (304 N⋅m). The engine is essentially an update to the C30A and does not share commonality with the C32A. Honda increased displacement to 3.2 L (195 cu in) through the use of larger 93 mm (3.7 in) pistons over the 90 mm (3.5 in) used in the C30A. To accommodate the larger pistons, Honda used an advanced metallurgical technique on the cylinders called Fiber Reinforced Metal (FRM), in which an ultra lightweight alumina-carbon fiber is cast into the traditional aluminum alloy for enhanced rigidity. This process allowed thinner cylinder walls to be used while providing acceptable cooling characteristics. The C32B also used 36 mm (1.4 in) intake valves, which are 1 mm (0.04 in) larger than those in the C30A.

Applications:

C35A

The C35A is a SOHC and carries the largest displacement of the C series at 3.5 L (214 cu in). The c35a was the first mass produced engine to use block forged connecting rods contributing to precise balancing and an exceptionally strong bottom end.[2] The C35 also contains a balance shaft to dampen engine vibrations associated with 90 degree design V6 engines.[2] Besides the addition of these forged components, the overall design is similar to its smaller counterpart the C32A, with some parts being interchangeable. The 9.6:1 compression ratio of the C32A is also retained, despite the increase in displacement.[2]

Applications:

  • C35A - SOHC - 210–225 hp

C35B

The C35B (name unconfirmed) is a DOHC V6 with VTEC which shares basic design properties with its SOHC non-VTEC counterpart but with more aggressive camshafts and slightly lighter cylinder walls. This was the only DOHC VTEC V6 ever built by Honda for longitudinal applications and was only used in one non-production car, the Honda FS-X concept.

Applications:

  • 1991 Honda FS-X concept- 280 hp (209 kW)

See also

References

wiki2.org

honda a engine : Wikis (The Full Wiki)

History

The Honda A-series engines succeeded the earlier EZ, ES, BS and ET engines in the Honda Accord and Prelude. Some of those engines were actually early A-series engines and parts between them may be cross-compatibleTemplate:Fact There were several variations, ranging from the 1.6 liter A16A to the 2.0 liter A20A. All A-series engines have iron blocks with single overhead camshaft aluminum heads and are the last iron blocked engine produced by Honda. They came in both carbed and fuel injected configurations.

Technology and advancement

The A-series engines don't have VTEC system. Analysis of the head construction has showed that Honda was using valve geometry and technology several years ahead of their time.Template:Fact Also, the later model of the A20A3 and A20A4 benefitted from the addition of a dual-stage runner intake manifold design, 4-2-1 headers, and a more electronic form of the vacuum advanced distributor. The Programmed fuel injection engines were equipped with partial OBD-0 engine computers.

Aftermarket

The aftermarket for the Accord and Prelude A series engine has died out. Below is a list of some previous backers.

  • GUDE: Head package, Header, Cam Grind
  • DC SPORTS: Stainless Cat-back, 4-2-1 Header
  • PAECO: Full Engine Build, Header
  • S&S: 4-1 Header
  • PACESETTER: 4-2-1 Header
  • HOTBITS: 4-2-1 Header
  • LIGHTSPEED: 4-2-1 Header
  • MOSSELMAN: Log Turbo Manifold

Most upgrades and modifications to the A-series engines are of the DIY variety, with one of the more popular being a turbo set-up. Because of their closed-deck iron block design, they're especially well-suited for handling boost. Although some company's still produce Performance parts for the 86-89 Accord.

  • Weapon-R: Intake for the LX-i
  • PaceSetter: Header and Exhaust system
  • NOLOGY: Sparkplug Wires
  • Ground Control: Coilover Sleeves
  • Sprint: Lowering Springs
  • B+G: Lowering Springs
  • Eibach: Lowering Springs
  • H&R: Lowering Springs
  • Neuspeed: Lowering Springs
  • Addco: Sway bars
  • Clutch Masters: Performance Clutch
  • ACT: Performance Clutch
  • Unorthodox Racing: Performance Clutch
  • Extreme Dimensions: Body Kit
  • Kaminari: Body Kit
  • Xenon: Body Kit
  • Carbon EFX: CarbonFiber Hood

A VTEC version of the A-series engine was never produced, so swaps akin to an LS/VTEC or "mini-me" aren't doable because no VTEC head bolts to the A-series block. However there have been attempts to bolt DOHC heads to the A-Series which are not at all as easy as bolt and go. The holes are not perfectly aligned, nor do the cam and crank sprockets have the correct diameters.

A-Series engines

A16A1

The A16A1 was a carburated 1.6 liter engine used in 1986-1989 Accords in the non-USDM market. This engine was known as the EZ in 1984 and 1985, non-US Accords.

Specifications

  • Carbeurated
  • Displacement: 1,596 cc (97.4 cu in)
  • Bore: 80 mm (3.1 in)
  • Stroke: 79.5 mm (3.13 in)
  • Power:
    • 88 hp (66 kW) @ 6000 rpm
    • Template:Convert/ft.lbf torque @ 3500 rpm

A18A

The A18A engine was the 1.8 liter engine found in 1984-1987 Honda Prelude in the US. Abroad, it was also available in the 1986-1989 Accords and Vigors. It was known as the ET1 in the 1984 and 1985 non-US Accords.

Specifications

  • Carburated
  • Displacement: 1,829 cc (111.6 cu in)
  • Bore: 80 mm (3.1 in)
  • Stroke: 91 mm (3.6 in)
  • Power:
    • 110 hp (82 kW) @ 5800 rpm
    • Template:Convert/ft.lbf @ 3500 rpm

A20A

The A20A is probably the most plentiful of all the Honda A-series engines. It was available in both carbureted and PGM-FI versions. They were found in both Accords and Preludes throughout the 1980s.

A20A1 & A20A2

The A20A1 and A20A2 were the carbureted versions of the A20A engines. It was available in the 1984-1987 Honda Preludes as well as the 1982-1989 Accord DX and LX. They are the same engine, the only difference between them being that the A20A2 has no emissions components, so it has a slightly higher power output (hp and tq numbers for A20A1 only).

Specifications

  • Exhaust: 4-1 Cast Manifold
  • Induction: Carbureted 2bbl Keihin ( Feedback Carb )
  • Displacement: 1,955 cc (119.3 cu in)
  • Bore: 82.7 mm (3.26 in)
  • Stroke: 91 mm (3.6 in)
  • Power:
    • 98 hp (73 kW)
    • Template:Convert/ft.lbf at 3500 rpm
A20A3 and A20A4

The A20A3 and A20A4 were the fuel injected versions of the A20A engines. They were run by Honda's PGM-FI system on a partial OBD-0 computer. Again, there is no real difference between the A20A3 and the A20A4 besides the A20A4 having a slightly higher power output because of not having emissions components (hp and tq numbers for A20A3 only). The A20A3 was offered in the 1984-1987 Honda Prelude 2.0Si, the 1989 Honda Accord SE-i, and the 1986-1989 Honda Accord LX-i.

Specifications

  • PGM-FI
  • Displacement: 1,955 cc (119.3 cu in)
  • Bore:82.7 mm (3.26 in)
  • Stroke:91 mm (3.6 in)
  • Power:
    • 1986-1987: 110 hp (82 kW) @ 5500 rpm & Template:Convert/ft.lbf @ 4500 rpm
    • 1988-1989: 120 hp (89 kW) @ 5500 rpm & Template:Convert/ft.lbf @ 4000 rpm (12 valve)

See also

External links

www.thefullwiki.org


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