Honda express


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Honda express • Wikipedia

Look for Honda express on one of Wikipedia's sister projects:
Wiktionary (free dictionary)
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Wikiquote (quotations)
Wikisource (free library)
Wikiversity (free learning resources)
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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. Please search for Honda express in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings.
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Honda Express

Infobox Motorcyclename = Express

aka = manufacturer = Hondaparent_company = production = 1977-1983predecessor = successor = class = Scooterengine = 50 cc air-cooled two stroketop_speed = power = torque = transmission = automaticsuspension = brakes = tires = rake_trail = wheelbase = length= width= height= seat_height = dry_weight = wet_weight = fuel_capacity = related = Express II, Express SR, Urban Expresssimilar = The Honda Express is a motor scooter made by Honda between 1977 and 1983. Variants include the Express, Express II, Express SR and Urban Express.All versions of the Express line are powered by an air cooled 50cc two Stroke engine coupled to an automatic transmission.

Introduction

The Honda motorcycle corp. of Japan released the Honda Express (NC50) to the North American market in 1977. This new bike was designed to enter the large market for scooters that developed following the 1973 oil crisis. As such it came with a fuel efficient single cylinder two-stroke engine. It was also designed to be simple to operate, as many owners would be inexperienced with or intimidated by larger, more complex motorcycles. Honda accomplished this by using a fully automatic transmission and a small oil pump to self mix the Express's oil and fuel, thus eliminating the need for premixing.

Models

NC50

A 49cc scooter which was manufactured from 1977 until 1983, it featured an air cooled 2-stroke engine.The versions from 1977 until 1980 had a manual choke, points ignition and a spring starter. Versions from 1980 onwards included a kick start, capacitor discharge ignition and automatic choke as well as an improved compression ratio. Most versions include an automatic one speed transmission with a centrifugal clutch, double suspension and forced lubrication (does not run on mix). Two speed automatic transmissions were introduced towards the end of their production run.

Restoration

Today many scooter hobbyists have Expresses because they are reported to be reliable.fact|date=July 2007 There are numerous forums and websites on which shop manuals and repair advice can be found.

Used models go for anywhere from $50 on up to $700.

Chronology

* 1977 The Honda Express (NC50) is introduced.

* 1979 The Express II (NA50) is introduced alongside the Express. Both feature the same drivetrain, but the new model is built with a redesigned frame and larger seat.

* 1980 Turn signals and a larger battery to match are added.

* 1981 Both models see a series of improvements, including an automatic choke unit, a more rugged kick starter to replace the wind up starter, and a solid state Capacitor discharge ignition in place of the contact breaker based system. The Express II also receives an automatic two-speed transmission.

* Also new in 1981 is the Express SR (NX50). This is a scooter variant of the Express with a somewhat modified engine. It is the first Express to feature an electric starter, 12v electrical system and a Honda V-Matic continuously variable transmission.

* 1982 The Express receives a new frame design and the two speed transmission seen the previous year on the NA50. The Express II model is dropped, and a new model called the Urban Express (NU50) takes its place. This model features a frame similar to the NA50, and a drivetrain identical to the Express SR's, outside of its transmission gearing and electric starter. The Urban Express Deluxe (NU50m) is the same as the standard model, but comes with an electric starter and larger battery to operate it.

* 1983 This is the final year of the Express series in North America. The NC50 remains unchanged from its previous year. The Express SR is no longer available.

* 1984 This is the final year of the Express series in the United Kingdom.

External links

* [http://www.mopedriders.org/index.php Moped Rider's Association] * [http://www.mopedarmy.com Moped Army] * [http://expresslymopeds.50megs.com/ Expressly Moped's] * [http://expresslyhonda.yuku.com/ Honda Express Forum]

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

en.academic.ru

honda express - The Full Wiki

Express Manufacturer Production Class Engine Transmission Related
Honda
1977-1983
Scooter
50 cc air-cooled two stroke
automatic
Express II, Express SR, Urban Express

The Honda Express or Honda NC50 is a moped made by Honda between 1977 and 1983. Variants include the Express, Express II, Express SR and Urban Express. All versions of the Express line are powered by an air cooled 50cc two Stroke engine coupled to an automatic transmission.

Introduction

The Honda motorcycle corp. of Japan released the Honda Express (NC50) to the North American market in 1977. This new bike was designed to enter the large market for mopeds that developed following the 1973 oil crisis. As such it came with a fuel efficient single cylinder two-stroke engine. It was also designed to be simple to operate, as many owners would be inexperienced with or intimidated by larger, more complex motorcycles. Honda accomplished this by using a fully automatic transmission and a small oil pump to self mix the Express's oil and fuel, thus eliminating the need for premixing.

Models

NC50

A 49cc moped which was manufactured from 1977 until 1983, it featured an air cooled 2-stroke engine. The versions from 1977 until 1980 had a manual choke, points ignition and a spring starter. Versions from 1980 onwards included a kick start, capacitor discharge ignition and automatic choke as well as an improved compression ratio. Most versions include an automatic one speed transmission with a centrifugal clutch, double suspension and forced lubrication (does not run on mix). Two speed automatic transmissions were introduced towards the end of their production run.

Restoration

Today many moped hobbyists have Expresses because they are reported to be reliable.Template:Fact There are numerous forums and websites on which shop manuals and repair advice can be found.

Used models go for anywhere from $50 on up to $700.

Chronology

  • 1977 The Honda Express (NC50) is introduced.
  • 1979 The Express II (NA50) is introduced alongside the Express. Both feature the same drivetrain, but the new model is built with a redesigned frame and larger seat.
  • 1980 Turn signals and a larger battery to match are added.
  • 1981 Both models see a series of improvements, including an automatic choke unit, a more rugged kick starter to replace the wind up starter, and a solid state Capacitor discharge ignition in place of the contact breaker based system. The Express II also receives an automatic two-speed transmission.
  • Also new in 1981 is the Express SR (NX50). This is a scooter variant of the Express with a somewhat modified engine. It is the first Express to feature an electric starter, 12v electrical system and a Honda V-Matic continuously variable transmission.
  • 1982 The Express receives a new frame design and the two speed transmission seen the previous year on the NA50. The Express II model is dropped, and a new model called the Urban Express (NU50) takes its place. This model features a frame similar to the NA50, and a drivetrain identical to the Express SR's, outside of its transmission gearing and electric starter. The Urban Express Deluxe (NU50m) is the same as the standard model, but comes with an electric starter and larger battery to operate it.
  • 1983 This is the final year of the Express series in North America. The NC50 remains unchanged from its previous year. The Express SR is no longer available.
  • 1984 This is the final year of the Express series in the United Kingdom.

External links

www.thefullwiki.org

Honda Express SR (NX50) | Motor Scooter Guide

The Express name typically brings to mind Honda’s family of 70’s mopeds, but the Express SR (model code NX50) was an interesting late addition to the family which blurred the line between a moped and a scooter. The Express SR was designed during the same period as Honda was conceiving of their Aero line of fully modern scooters (called the Tact in Japan). Perhaps concerned the modern scooter concept would be too radical for buyers, the Express SR was a way of fusing scooter practicality with Honda’s previous moped successes.Model OverviewWhile not employing all the traditional characteristics of a modern scooter, the Express SR used enough of them (electric start, oil injection, auto-choke, CVT, plastic panels) to become arguably the first modern scooter sold in North America. All it lacked was side panels over the engine, under seat storage and a full height leg shield. The Express SR debuted for 1981 in both the USA and Canada and lasted just two years, with Honda’s Aero 50 taking over for 1983. Honda’s decision to switch to the Aero line was likely due to the impressive overseas success of that model when it was released a couple years prior. Both Honda and Yamaha were enjoying strong demand for their modern scooter designs by 1983 and thus the decision was made to abandon mopeds all together. The 1982 Express SR was virtually unchanged from the ’81 model except for revised decals on the sites with ‘express’ switched to upper case letters and a long stripe trailed along behind the new logo (not shown).The NX50 differed from the Express mopeds (Express, Express II, Urban Express) by offering a full step thru frame plus a floorboard area for the riders feet (instead of pedals or pegs). The Express SR also launched the ‘modern scooter’ era with its CVT transmission, electric start, 12 volt electronics, auto-choke and oil injection. Honda’s “V-Matic” CVT was first deployed in the Express SR and would go onto play an important role in Honda scooters for decades. Electric start and 12 volt electronics also debuted in North America for the first time in a 50cc with the Express SR. The 1980 Express II moped was the first 50cc with auto-choke, but most of these other innovations were new with the Express SR and then trickled down to the Urban Express and Urban Express Deluxe mopeds the following year.Internationally (UK, Japan et al) the Express SR was sold as the Honda Caren (1980 - 1983), not to be confused with Honda’s 3 wheeled 50cc moped/car/oddity of the same moniker.MotorProviding propulsion for the Express SR was a 50cc, 2-stroke motor with a horizontal layout. This motor was radical for its time with the aforementioned list of impressive innovations (CVT, oil injection, auto-choke). This motor was capable of 35-40mph when in good running form. In the three decades that have elapsed since the SR was in showrooms, some parts (ie. drive belts) have gotten scarce and the years have taken their toll on other parts - so not too many examples are capable of better than 30-35mph these days. Your best bet for a replacement drive belt is one from Gates (belt # 9290) which fits nicely.

The Express SR was only offered in one version. There wasn’t a moped restricted (30mph) or ‘Iowa’ restricted (25mph) version. If you’re looking for parts, Honda used this same motor in Urban Express Deluxe (NU50) but not in any of the other Express mopeds. If you’re looking for more speed, 70cc big bore kits from other late 70’s Honda mopeds will bolt on. Be aware though that you’ll need to adjust the carb to get reliable use of these kits and modifying the exhaust and gearing is key to getting the full potential.

Design and AmenitiesBy scooter standards the Express SR was a fairly minimalist design. There was no glovebox up front, nor did Honda engineer any storage under the seat. The latter space was fully occupied by the separate oil and gas tanks. The former contained just a helmet lock. Quite uniquely, the Express SR gas tank sported a fuel gauge mounted directly on top - and thus out of sight under the seat.

To take some of the sting off the lack of enclosed storage, Honda did include a white metal basket located on the front of the scooter as a standard feature.

While Honda touted this scooter as being suited for beginners, the automatic start and oil injection features made the scooter a lot nicer for anyone to live with. Honda also included a kick start for those occasional times when a dead battery presents a challenge. DiscussionCompared to the modern scooters that would follow, the Express SR enjoyed relatively modest sales. Nice examples are uncommon but not unheard of. Aside from the lack of enclosed storage and some difficult to find parts, this scooter is still a neat little machine that can be both practical and a blast to ride. If you come across one that has been reasonably well taken care of then you could easily enjoy years of reliable use once you sort out any kinks from it being stored for long periods.The other neat thing about the Express SR is the role it played in the history of scooters. It’s quite a unique machine - a true ‘missing link’ in the evolution of modern scooters. It’s great to see people continuing to maintain and enjoy these vintage Honda’s.OWNER REVIEWS (4) - Browse Express SR Owner Reviews           REVIEW - Add Your Review Pros:* Neat part of scooter history* Unique moped/scooter looksCons:* No enclosed storage* Parts are getting scarceLinks:Express SR Service Manual - Great tech info for working on your ExpressExpress SR Brochure - Nice Honda Brochure from 1981MotorscooterGuide Forums - Visit the forum to chat about your scoot.Colors:1981: Monza Red, Angel Blue1982: Monza Red, Angel BlueKey Specs: 1981 - 1982 Express SR* Engine: 49cc air cooled, single cylinder, 2-stroke* Compression: 7.3:1* Bore x Stroke: 40.0mm x 39.3 mm* Spark Plug: BP5HS* Transmission: Honda V-matic variable ratio with automatic clutch* Ignition: Capacitor discharge* Starter: Electric* Final Drive: V-Belt* Length: 61.7”* Width: 24.4”* Wheelbase: 43.1”* Seat height: 28.1”* Dry weight: 125.7 lbs* Weight capacity: 180 lbs* Fuel Capacity: 1.0 gallon (including 0.2 gallon reserve)* Wheels: 2.75-10 (Front and Rear)* Front Suspension: Telescopic fork, 50mm travel* Rear Suspension: Single shock, 39mm travel* Brakes: Drum / Drum © 2008 - 2018 Motor Scooter Guide - Contact - Privacy Policy

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